Phenolic composition of tomato varieties and an industrial tomato by-product: free, conjugated and bound phenolics and antioxidant activity

Xiomara Patricia Perea-Domínguez, Lizeth Zugey Hernández-Gastelum, Heidy Rosario Olivas-Olguin, Laura Gabriela Espinosa-Alonso, Maribel Valdez-Morales, Sergio Medina-Godoy

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Abstract

© 2018, Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India). The aim of this study was to isolate, identify and quantify soluble free phenolics, conjugated acid-hydrolysable phenolics (AHP) and alkaline-hydrolysable phenolics, and bound phenolics (BP) fractions from two tomato varieties (saladette and grape) and an industrial tomato by-product, as well as, to determine their antioxidant capacity. Phenolic composition was determined using Folin–Ciocalteu’s method and HPLC–DAD. AHP were predominant in grape and saladette tomato extracts (91.47 ± 17.28 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE) per g dry extract (DE) and 57.41 ± 8.80 mg GAE per g DE, respectively), while BP form was predominant in tomato by-product (51.30 ± 10.91 GAE per g DE). AHP extract of grape tomato presented the highest antioxidant capacity by DPPH assay (252.35 ± 42.55 μmol trolox equiv (TE) per g DE). In the case of ORAC assay, AHP fractions from both grape (1005.19 ± 138.52 μmol TE per g DE) and saladette tomatoes (804.16 ± 131.45 μmol TE per g DE), and BP fraction from by-product (852.40 ± 71.46 μmol TE per g DE) showed the highest ORAC values. Caffeic acid was the most abundant phenolic acid and it was found mainly in its conjugated forms. Naringenin was the most abundant flavonoid and it was mainly detected in bound form. Our analysis allowed a better characterization of phenolic compounds in whole tomato and by-product, remarking the importance of the fractionation. The valorization of the industrial tomato by-product, through the use of its different fractions of phenolic antioxidant compounds, could generate additional income to the tomato industry and reduce the waste disposal problem.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)3453-3461
Number of pages3106
JournalJournal of Food Science and Technology
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2018

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Lycopersicon esculentum
Antioxidants
antioxidant activity
tomatoes
phenolic acids
extracts
Vitis
Gallic Acid
gallic acid
grapes
antioxidants
grape tomatoes
naringenin
waste disposal
assays
caffeic acid
Flavonoids
India
phenolic compounds
fractionation

Cite this

@article{2247a9b0eeaf4f2a99d2dad1a777cfd8,
title = "Phenolic composition of tomato varieties and an industrial tomato by-product: free, conjugated and bound phenolics and antioxidant activity",
abstract = "{\circledC} 2018, Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India). The aim of this study was to isolate, identify and quantify soluble free phenolics, conjugated acid-hydrolysable phenolics (AHP) and alkaline-hydrolysable phenolics, and bound phenolics (BP) fractions from two tomato varieties (saladette and grape) and an industrial tomato by-product, as well as, to determine their antioxidant capacity. Phenolic composition was determined using Folin–Ciocalteu’s method and HPLC–DAD. AHP were predominant in grape and saladette tomato extracts (91.47 ± 17.28 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE) per g dry extract (DE) and 57.41 ± 8.80 mg GAE per g DE, respectively), while BP form was predominant in tomato by-product (51.30 ± 10.91 GAE per g DE). AHP extract of grape tomato presented the highest antioxidant capacity by DPPH assay (252.35 ± 42.55 μmol trolox equiv (TE) per g DE). In the case of ORAC assay, AHP fractions from both grape (1005.19 ± 138.52 μmol TE per g DE) and saladette tomatoes (804.16 ± 131.45 μmol TE per g DE), and BP fraction from by-product (852.40 ± 71.46 μmol TE per g DE) showed the highest ORAC values. Caffeic acid was the most abundant phenolic acid and it was found mainly in its conjugated forms. Naringenin was the most abundant flavonoid and it was mainly detected in bound form. Our analysis allowed a better characterization of phenolic compounds in whole tomato and by-product, remarking the importance of the fractionation. The valorization of the industrial tomato by-product, through the use of its different fractions of phenolic antioxidant compounds, could generate additional income to the tomato industry and reduce the waste disposal problem.",
author = "Perea-Dom{\'i}nguez, {Xiomara Patricia} and Hern{\'a}ndez-Gastelum, {Lizeth Zugey} and Olivas-Olguin, {Heidy Rosario} and Espinosa-Alonso, {Laura Gabriela} and Maribel Valdez-Morales and Sergio Medina-Godoy",
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Phenolic composition of tomato varieties and an industrial tomato by-product: free, conjugated and bound phenolics and antioxidant activity. / Perea-Domínguez, Xiomara Patricia; Hernández-Gastelum, Lizeth Zugey; Olivas-Olguin, Heidy Rosario; Espinosa-Alonso, Laura Gabriela; Valdez-Morales, Maribel; Medina-Godoy, Sergio.

In: Journal of Food Science and Technology, 01.09.2018, p. 3453-3461.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Phenolic composition of tomato varieties and an industrial tomato by-product: free, conjugated and bound phenolics and antioxidant activity

AU - Perea-Domínguez, Xiomara Patricia

AU - Hernández-Gastelum, Lizeth Zugey

AU - Olivas-Olguin, Heidy Rosario

AU - Espinosa-Alonso, Laura Gabriela

AU - Valdez-Morales, Maribel

AU - Medina-Godoy, Sergio

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N2 - © 2018, Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India). The aim of this study was to isolate, identify and quantify soluble free phenolics, conjugated acid-hydrolysable phenolics (AHP) and alkaline-hydrolysable phenolics, and bound phenolics (BP) fractions from two tomato varieties (saladette and grape) and an industrial tomato by-product, as well as, to determine their antioxidant capacity. Phenolic composition was determined using Folin–Ciocalteu’s method and HPLC–DAD. AHP were predominant in grape and saladette tomato extracts (91.47 ± 17.28 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE) per g dry extract (DE) and 57.41 ± 8.80 mg GAE per g DE, respectively), while BP form was predominant in tomato by-product (51.30 ± 10.91 GAE per g DE). AHP extract of grape tomato presented the highest antioxidant capacity by DPPH assay (252.35 ± 42.55 μmol trolox equiv (TE) per g DE). In the case of ORAC assay, AHP fractions from both grape (1005.19 ± 138.52 μmol TE per g DE) and saladette tomatoes (804.16 ± 131.45 μmol TE per g DE), and BP fraction from by-product (852.40 ± 71.46 μmol TE per g DE) showed the highest ORAC values. Caffeic acid was the most abundant phenolic acid and it was found mainly in its conjugated forms. Naringenin was the most abundant flavonoid and it was mainly detected in bound form. Our analysis allowed a better characterization of phenolic compounds in whole tomato and by-product, remarking the importance of the fractionation. The valorization of the industrial tomato by-product, through the use of its different fractions of phenolic antioxidant compounds, could generate additional income to the tomato industry and reduce the waste disposal problem.

AB - © 2018, Association of Food Scientists & Technologists (India). The aim of this study was to isolate, identify and quantify soluble free phenolics, conjugated acid-hydrolysable phenolics (AHP) and alkaline-hydrolysable phenolics, and bound phenolics (BP) fractions from two tomato varieties (saladette and grape) and an industrial tomato by-product, as well as, to determine their antioxidant capacity. Phenolic composition was determined using Folin–Ciocalteu’s method and HPLC–DAD. AHP were predominant in grape and saladette tomato extracts (91.47 ± 17.28 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE) per g dry extract (DE) and 57.41 ± 8.80 mg GAE per g DE, respectively), while BP form was predominant in tomato by-product (51.30 ± 10.91 GAE per g DE). AHP extract of grape tomato presented the highest antioxidant capacity by DPPH assay (252.35 ± 42.55 μmol trolox equiv (TE) per g DE). In the case of ORAC assay, AHP fractions from both grape (1005.19 ± 138.52 μmol TE per g DE) and saladette tomatoes (804.16 ± 131.45 μmol TE per g DE), and BP fraction from by-product (852.40 ± 71.46 μmol TE per g DE) showed the highest ORAC values. Caffeic acid was the most abundant phenolic acid and it was found mainly in its conjugated forms. Naringenin was the most abundant flavonoid and it was mainly detected in bound form. Our analysis allowed a better characterization of phenolic compounds in whole tomato and by-product, remarking the importance of the fractionation. The valorization of the industrial tomato by-product, through the use of its different fractions of phenolic antioxidant compounds, could generate additional income to the tomato industry and reduce the waste disposal problem.

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