Innovations in starch-based film technology

M. García, A. M. Rojas, J. B. Laurindo, C. A. Romero-Bastida, M. V.E. Grossmann, M. N. Martino, S. Flores, P. B. Zamudio-Flores, S. Mali, N. E. Zaritzky, P. Sobral, L. Famá, L. A. Bello-Pérez, F. Yamashita, A. P. del Beleia

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Edible and biodegradable films can offer great potential to enhance food quality, safety and stability. The unique advantages of edible films and coatings may lead to new product developments, such as individual packaging of particulate foods, carriers for different additives, and nutrient supplements (Vermeiren et al., 1999). Composite films can be formulated to combine the advantages of each component. Proteins and polysaccharides provide the supporting matrix and are good barriers to gases, while lipids provide a good barrier to water vapor (Krochta and De Mulder Johnston, 1997). Over the last few years, there has been a renewed interest in biodegradable films and films made from renewable and natural polymers such as starch (Lawton, 1996; Vicentini et al., 2005). Several studies have been done to analyze the properties of starch-based films (Lawton and Fanta, 1994; Lourdin et al., 1995; Arvanitoyannis et al., 1998; Garcia et al., 1998a, 1998b, 2000a, 2000b, 2001; Mali et al., 2002; Vicentini et al., 2005). The use of a biopolymer such as starch can be an interesting solution because this polymer is quite cheap, abundant, biodegradable and edible. Amylose is responsible for the film-forming capacity of the starches. Starches are polymers that naturally occur in a variety of botanical sources such as wheat, corn, potatoes and tapioca or cassava. It is a renewable resource widely available and can be obtained from different by-products of harvesting and raw material industrialization.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFood Engineering Series
PublisherSpringer Boston
Pages431-454
Number of pages24
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2008

Publication series

NameFood Engineering Series
ISSN (Print)1571-0297

Fingerprint

Starch
films (materials)
Innovation
starch
Technology
biodegradability
Manihot
Polymers
polymers
edible films
Food Packaging
Food Quality
Amylose
Biopolymers
Food Safety
Natural polymers
Steam
tapioca
Solanum tuberosum
renewable resources

Keywords

  • Edible film
  • Kraft paper
  • Potassium sorbate
  • Water vapor permeability
  • Water vapor transmission rate

Cite this

García, M., Rojas, A. M., Laurindo, J. B., Romero-Bastida, C. A., Grossmann, M. V. E., Martino, M. N., ... del Beleia, A. P. (2008). Innovations in starch-based film technology. In Food Engineering Series (pp. 431-454). (Food Engineering Series). Springer Boston. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-75430-7_32
García, M. ; Rojas, A. M. ; Laurindo, J. B. ; Romero-Bastida, C. A. ; Grossmann, M. V.E. ; Martino, M. N. ; Flores, S. ; Zamudio-Flores, P. B. ; Mali, S. ; Zaritzky, N. E. ; Sobral, P. ; Famá, L. ; Bello-Pérez, L. A. ; Yamashita, F. ; del Beleia, A. P. / Innovations in starch-based film technology. Food Engineering Series. Springer Boston, 2008. pp. 431-454 (Food Engineering Series).
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abstract = "Edible and biodegradable films can offer great potential to enhance food quality, safety and stability. The unique advantages of edible films and coatings may lead to new product developments, such as individual packaging of particulate foods, carriers for different additives, and nutrient supplements (Vermeiren et al., 1999). Composite films can be formulated to combine the advantages of each component. Proteins and polysaccharides provide the supporting matrix and are good barriers to gases, while lipids provide a good barrier to water vapor (Krochta and De Mulder Johnston, 1997). Over the last few years, there has been a renewed interest in biodegradable films and films made from renewable and natural polymers such as starch (Lawton, 1996; Vicentini et al., 2005). Several studies have been done to analyze the properties of starch-based films (Lawton and Fanta, 1994; Lourdin et al., 1995; Arvanitoyannis et al., 1998; Garcia et al., 1998a, 1998b, 2000a, 2000b, 2001; Mali et al., 2002; Vicentini et al., 2005). The use of a biopolymer such as starch can be an interesting solution because this polymer is quite cheap, abundant, biodegradable and edible. Amylose is responsible for the film-forming capacity of the starches. Starches are polymers that naturally occur in a variety of botanical sources such as wheat, corn, potatoes and tapioca or cassava. It is a renewable resource widely available and can be obtained from different by-products of harvesting and raw material industrialization.",
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author = "M. Garc{\'i}a and Rojas, {A. M.} and Laurindo, {J. B.} and Romero-Bastida, {C. A.} and Grossmann, {M. V.E.} and Martino, {M. N.} and S. Flores and Zamudio-Flores, {P. B.} and S. Mali and Zaritzky, {N. E.} and P. Sobral and L. Fam{\'a} and Bello-P{\'e}rez, {L. A.} and F. Yamashita and {del Beleia}, {A. P.}",
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García, M, Rojas, AM, Laurindo, JB, Romero-Bastida, CA, Grossmann, MVE, Martino, MN, Flores, S, Zamudio-Flores, PB, Mali, S, Zaritzky, NE, Sobral, P, Famá, L, Bello-Pérez, LA, Yamashita, F & del Beleia, AP 2008, Innovations in starch-based film technology. in Food Engineering Series. Food Engineering Series, Springer Boston, pp. 431-454. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-75430-7_32

Innovations in starch-based film technology. / García, M.; Rojas, A. M.; Laurindo, J. B.; Romero-Bastida, C. A.; Grossmann, M. V.E.; Martino, M. N.; Flores, S.; Zamudio-Flores, P. B.; Mali, S.; Zaritzky, N. E.; Sobral, P.; Famá, L.; Bello-Pérez, L. A.; Yamashita, F.; del Beleia, A. P.

Food Engineering Series. Springer Boston, 2008. p. 431-454 (Food Engineering Series).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

TY - CHAP

T1 - Innovations in starch-based film technology

AU - García, M.

AU - Rojas, A. M.

AU - Laurindo, J. B.

AU - Romero-Bastida, C. A.

AU - Grossmann, M. V.E.

AU - Martino, M. N.

AU - Flores, S.

AU - Zamudio-Flores, P. B.

AU - Mali, S.

AU - Zaritzky, N. E.

AU - Sobral, P.

AU - Famá, L.

AU - Bello-Pérez, L. A.

AU - Yamashita, F.

AU - del Beleia, A. P.

PY - 2008/1/1

Y1 - 2008/1/1

N2 - Edible and biodegradable films can offer great potential to enhance food quality, safety and stability. The unique advantages of edible films and coatings may lead to new product developments, such as individual packaging of particulate foods, carriers for different additives, and nutrient supplements (Vermeiren et al., 1999). Composite films can be formulated to combine the advantages of each component. Proteins and polysaccharides provide the supporting matrix and are good barriers to gases, while lipids provide a good barrier to water vapor (Krochta and De Mulder Johnston, 1997). Over the last few years, there has been a renewed interest in biodegradable films and films made from renewable and natural polymers such as starch (Lawton, 1996; Vicentini et al., 2005). Several studies have been done to analyze the properties of starch-based films (Lawton and Fanta, 1994; Lourdin et al., 1995; Arvanitoyannis et al., 1998; Garcia et al., 1998a, 1998b, 2000a, 2000b, 2001; Mali et al., 2002; Vicentini et al., 2005). The use of a biopolymer such as starch can be an interesting solution because this polymer is quite cheap, abundant, biodegradable and edible. Amylose is responsible for the film-forming capacity of the starches. Starches are polymers that naturally occur in a variety of botanical sources such as wheat, corn, potatoes and tapioca or cassava. It is a renewable resource widely available and can be obtained from different by-products of harvesting and raw material industrialization.

AB - Edible and biodegradable films can offer great potential to enhance food quality, safety and stability. The unique advantages of edible films and coatings may lead to new product developments, such as individual packaging of particulate foods, carriers for different additives, and nutrient supplements (Vermeiren et al., 1999). Composite films can be formulated to combine the advantages of each component. Proteins and polysaccharides provide the supporting matrix and are good barriers to gases, while lipids provide a good barrier to water vapor (Krochta and De Mulder Johnston, 1997). Over the last few years, there has been a renewed interest in biodegradable films and films made from renewable and natural polymers such as starch (Lawton, 1996; Vicentini et al., 2005). Several studies have been done to analyze the properties of starch-based films (Lawton and Fanta, 1994; Lourdin et al., 1995; Arvanitoyannis et al., 1998; Garcia et al., 1998a, 1998b, 2000a, 2000b, 2001; Mali et al., 2002; Vicentini et al., 2005). The use of a biopolymer such as starch can be an interesting solution because this polymer is quite cheap, abundant, biodegradable and edible. Amylose is responsible for the film-forming capacity of the starches. Starches are polymers that naturally occur in a variety of botanical sources such as wheat, corn, potatoes and tapioca or cassava. It is a renewable resource widely available and can be obtained from different by-products of harvesting and raw material industrialization.

KW - Edible film

KW - Kraft paper

KW - Potassium sorbate

KW - Water vapor permeability

KW - Water vapor transmission rate

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U2 - 10.1007/978-0-387-75430-7_32

DO - 10.1007/978-0-387-75430-7_32

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AN - SCOPUS:84879307879

T3 - Food Engineering Series

SP - 431

EP - 454

BT - Food Engineering Series

PB - Springer Boston

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García M, Rojas AM, Laurindo JB, Romero-Bastida CA, Grossmann MVE, Martino MN et al. Innovations in starch-based film technology. In Food Engineering Series. Springer Boston. 2008. p. 431-454. (Food Engineering Series). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-75430-7_32