Bioaccessibility of phenolic compounds in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) after in vitro gastrointestinal digestion: A comparison of two cooking procedures

Alicia P. Cárdenas-Castro, Jara Pérez-Jiménez, Luis A. Bello-Pérez, Juscelino Tovar, Sonia G. Sáyago-Ayerdi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

© 2020 Cereals & Grains Association. Background and objectives: Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are widely consumed, but the bioaccessibility of their phenolic compounds (PCs) may be affected by different factors. Within this framework, an in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of two bean varieties: “Azufrado” and “Negro Jamapa,” was performed and the bioaccessibility and in vitro release kinetics of PC was evaluated. Mashed beans were prepared by two common culinary procedures in Mexico: pressure cooking followed by mashing, and pressure cooking and mashing, followed by frying. Findings: The bioaccessibility of PC was about 50% in the cooked samples and 30% in cooked-fried samples. The cooking condition did not modify the PC release kinetics during the first 60 min in any of the bean preparations. Three PCs were identified by HPLC-DAD-MS: kaempferol-3-O-glucoside, quercetin-3-O-glucoside, and chlorogenic acid, which was the main PC released from all samples. Conclusions: Simulated gastrointestinal digestion revealed processing-related differences in the PC bioaccessibility in these two bean varieties, which should be further considered and evaluated in nutritional studies. Significance and novelty: The study is in line with current approaches for assessing PC bioaccessibility during the gastrointestinal digestion, providing knowledge on the types and quantities of PC released from the food matrix of beans as eaten.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)670-680
Number of pages11
JournalCereal Chemistry
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2020

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