Nutraceutical potential of peanut (arachis hypogaea) seeds

María del Carmen Robles-Ramírez, Laura Almazán-Rodríguez, Rosalva Mora-Escobedo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearch

Abstract

© 2014 Nova Science Publishers, Inc. In the global production of oilseeds, some seeds have had a greater importance than others, such as soybean, canola and sunflower. However, over time, new uses and better nutritive properties have been identified for oilseeds other than soy, canola, and sunflower. One such seed is the peanut seed, which has gained great importance in countries such as Mexico, the United States, India, China, and Russia, among others. Most of the peanut crop is processed into peanut butter, salted peanuts, candies, and snacks. In other areas of the world, such as Africa, India and China, where the majority of the world's peanut crop is grown, the peanut crop is also converted into oil and cake. The peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is an oilseed (also a legume) that contains a considerable amount of protein (approximately 30%), which is more than other true nuts. Peanuts also have a high oil content (almost 50%) and are rich in oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid that has been found to decrease LDL cholesterol levels without reducing the good HDL cholesterol levels. Moreover, peanuts are a rich source of other nutrients, such as fiber, niacin, folate, vitamin E, magnesium, manganese and phosphorous, as well as phytochemicals including phytosterols and phenolic compounds, which have important beneficial effects on human health. Several studies have associated peanut consumption with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. This fact has been linked with the high contents of dietary fiber, folate, alpha tocopherol, copper, magnesium, arginine and oleic acid in peanuts. On the other hand, peanuts are one of the few foods that contain resveratrol, a phytoalexin that has been demonstrated to have anticancer, neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory, blood sugar-lowering and cardioprotective effects in animal experiments. In this chapter we will review the origin, taxonomy, morphology, market trends, chemical composition and nutraceutical potential of this interesting seed.
Original languageAmerican English
Title of host publicationSeeds as Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals: New Frontiers in Food Science
Number of pages81
ISBN (Electronic)9781629486406, 9781628084894
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2014

Fingerprint

Arachis hypogaea
functional foods
peanuts
seeds
oilseeds
canola
folic acid
Helianthus annuus
oleic acid
magnesium
dietary fiber
crops
peanut butter
cardioprotective effect
India
candy
China
animal experimentation
phytoalexins
resveratrol

Cite this

Robles-Ramírez, M. D. C., Almazán-Rodríguez, L., & Mora-Escobedo, R. (2014). Nutraceutical potential of peanut (arachis hypogaea) seeds. In Seeds as Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals: New Frontiers in Food Science
Robles-Ramírez, María del Carmen ; Almazán-Rodríguez, Laura ; Mora-Escobedo, Rosalva. / Nutraceutical potential of peanut (arachis hypogaea) seeds. Seeds as Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals: New Frontiers in Food Science. 2014.
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Robles-Ramírez, MDC, Almazán-Rodríguez, L & Mora-Escobedo, R 2014, Nutraceutical potential of peanut (arachis hypogaea) seeds. in Seeds as Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals: New Frontiers in Food Science.

Nutraceutical potential of peanut (arachis hypogaea) seeds. / Robles-Ramírez, María del Carmen; Almazán-Rodríguez, Laura; Mora-Escobedo, Rosalva.

Seeds as Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals: New Frontiers in Food Science. 2014.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearch

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Robles-Ramírez MDC, Almazán-Rodríguez L, Mora-Escobedo R. Nutraceutical potential of peanut (arachis hypogaea) seeds. In Seeds as Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals: New Frontiers in Food Science. 2014