Impaired function of the spermatozoa: Links with mycoplasmal and chlamydial infections

Francisco Javier Díaz-García, Saúl Flores-Medina, Silvia Giono-Cerezo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

© 2010 Nova Science Publishers, Inc. Mycoplasmal and chlamydial infections of the male genital tract have been associated with impairment of the human sperm functionality. However this topic remains doubtful due to contradictory results obtained from several studies around the globe. In this review we will discuss recent evidence from in vitro studies that have confirmed that Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, U. parvum, M. genitalium and/or Chlamydia trachomatis can attach to and invade intact spermatozoa. Moreover we will explore how these bacterial infections can cause impaired sperm function and male infertility. First, bacteria attached to sperm membrane may provoke oxidative stress through release of reactive oxygen species, resulting in lipid peroxidation and reduction of membrane fluidity. Second, chlamydial lipopolysacharide interaction with sperm membrane alters the phosphorylation pattern of citosolic proteins, triggering apoptotic pathways. Third, internalized mycoplasmal and chlamydial cells disrupt the host cell energy production by competing for biosynthetic precursors, thereby altering sperm motility and viability. Fourth, mycoplasmal hydrolytic enzymes (endonucleases, fosfolipases, aminopeptidases) can considerably modify cellular and nuclear organization. Fifth, bacterial surface attachment may mask sperm receptors involved in chemotaxis and oocite recognition, thus impeding fertilization. Sixth, compromise of sperm membrane integrity can lead to exposure of self-antigens and elicitation of an autoimmune response of antisperm antibodies. Finally, we will offer new perspectives for the study of mycoplasmal and chlamydial infections of human spermatozoa.
Original languageAmerican English
Title of host publicationHuman Spermatozoa: Maturation, Capacitation and Abnormalities
Number of pages234
ISBN (Electronic)9781614700609, 9781608764013
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2010

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Spermatozoa
Infection
Membranes
Mycoplasma hominis
Ureaplasma urealyticum
Reproductive Tract Infections
Aminopeptidases
Membrane Fluidity
Sperm Motility
Endonucleases
Chlamydia trachomatis
Male Infertility
Autoantigens
Chemotaxis
Masks
Autoimmunity
Bacterial Infections
Fertilization
Lipid Peroxidation
Reactive Oxygen Species

Cite this

Díaz-García, F. J., Flores-Medina, S., & Giono-Cerezo, S. (2010). Impaired function of the spermatozoa: Links with mycoplasmal and chlamydial infections. In Human Spermatozoa: Maturation, Capacitation and Abnormalities
Díaz-García, Francisco Javier ; Flores-Medina, Saúl ; Giono-Cerezo, Silvia. / Impaired function of the spermatozoa: Links with mycoplasmal and chlamydial infections. Human Spermatozoa: Maturation, Capacitation and Abnormalities. 2010.
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Díaz-García, FJ, Flores-Medina, S & Giono-Cerezo, S 2010, Impaired function of the spermatozoa: Links with mycoplasmal and chlamydial infections. in Human Spermatozoa: Maturation, Capacitation and Abnormalities.

Impaired function of the spermatozoa: Links with mycoplasmal and chlamydial infections. / Díaz-García, Francisco Javier; Flores-Medina, Saúl; Giono-Cerezo, Silvia.

Human Spermatozoa: Maturation, Capacitation and Abnormalities. 2010.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Díaz-García FJ, Flores-Medina S, Giono-Cerezo S. Impaired function of the spermatozoa: Links with mycoplasmal and chlamydial infections. In Human Spermatozoa: Maturation, Capacitation and Abnormalities. 2010