Foam behavior of solid glass spheres - Zn22Al2Cu composites under compression stresses

J. A. Aragon-Lezama, A. Garcia-Borquez, G. Torres-Villaseñor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Solid glass spheres - Zn22Al2Cu composites, having different densities and microstructures, were elaborated and studied under compression. Their elaboration process involves alloy melting, spheres submersion into the liquid alloy and finally air cooling. The achieved composites with densities 2.6884, 2.7936 and 3.1219g/cm<sup>3</sup> were studied in casting and thermally induced, fine-grain matrix microstructures. Test samples of the composites were compressed at a 10<sup>-3</sup>s<sup>-1</sup> strain rate, and their microstructure characterized before and after compression by using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Although they exhibit different compression behavior depending on their density and microstructure, all of them show an elastic region at low strains, reach their maximum stress (σ<inf>max</inf>) at hundreds of MPa before the stress fall or collapse up to a lowest yield point (LYP), followed by an important plastic deformation at nearly constant stress (σ<inf>p</inf>): beyond this plateau, an extra deformation can be limitedly reached only by a significant stress increase. This behavior under compression stresses is similar to that reported for metal foams, being the composites with fine microstructure which nearest behave to metal foams under this pattern. Nevertheless, the relative values of the elastic modulus, and maximum and plateau stresses do not follow the Ashby equations by changing the relative density. Generally, the studied composites behave as foams under compression, except for their peculiar parameters values (σ<inf>max</inf>, LYP, and σ<inf>p</inf>).
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)165-173
Number of pages147
JournalMaterials Science and Engineering A
DOIs
StatePublished - 5 Jun 2015

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foams
Glass
Foams
Compaction
Metals
Specific Gravity
composite materials
glass
Elastic Modulus
Composite materials
Immersion
microstructure
Microstructure
Freezing
metal foams
Plastics
Air
Electrons
yield point
plateaus

Cite this

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title = "Foam behavior of solid glass spheres - Zn22Al2Cu composites under compression stresses",
abstract = "{\circledC} 2015 Elsevier B.V. Solid glass spheres - Zn22Al2Cu composites, having different densities and microstructures, were elaborated and studied under compression. Their elaboration process involves alloy melting, spheres submersion into the liquid alloy and finally air cooling. The achieved composites with densities 2.6884, 2.7936 and 3.1219g/cm3 were studied in casting and thermally induced, fine-grain matrix microstructures. Test samples of the composites were compressed at a 10-3s-1 strain rate, and their microstructure characterized before and after compression by using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Although they exhibit different compression behavior depending on their density and microstructure, all of them show an elastic region at low strains, reach their maximum stress (σmax) at hundreds of MPa before the stress fall or collapse up to a lowest yield point (LYP), followed by an important plastic deformation at nearly constant stress (σp): beyond this plateau, an extra deformation can be limitedly reached only by a significant stress increase. This behavior under compression stresses is similar to that reported for metal foams, being the composites with fine microstructure which nearest behave to metal foams under this pattern. Nevertheless, the relative values of the elastic modulus, and maximum and plateau stresses do not follow the Ashby equations by changing the relative density. Generally, the studied composites behave as foams under compression, except for their peculiar parameters values (σmax, LYP, and σp).",
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Foam behavior of solid glass spheres - Zn22Al2Cu composites under compression stresses. / Aragon-Lezama, J. A.; Garcia-Borquez, A.; Torres-Villaseñor, G.

In: Materials Science and Engineering A, 05.06.2015, p. 165-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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