Effects of high pressure processing on protein fractions of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) meat

M. A. Martínez, G. Velazquez, D. Cando, R. Núñez-Flores, A. J. Borderías, H. M. Moreno

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Abstract

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd The studies about the effect of high pressure processing (HPP) on the myofibrillar proteins of crab meat are scarce in the literature. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of high pressure processing (HPP) at 100, 300 and 600 MPa (10 °C/5 min) on the muscular protein fractions of blue crab meat (Callinectes sapidus) and compares the effect of high pressure treatments and the thermal cooking process on the yielding of crab meat. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis of raw crab meat showed two peaks at 48.18 and 76.76 °C corresponding to myosin and actin denaturation. The increasing in the pressure level resulted in a decrease in denaturation enthalpy of both proteins. Data from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated changes in the secondary protein structures in which a reduction in α-helix and an increase in β-turn were observed as a result of denaturation induced by HPP. Electrophoresis analysis (SDS-PAGE) showed myofibrillar protein denaturation as the pressure level increased. The HPP at 100 and 300 MPa resulted in a significant increase in the yielding of meat extracted when compared to the thermal treatment (90 °C/20 min). Higher sensory scores were obtained in 300 and 600 MPa suggesting higher acceptance. Results suggest the feasibility of applying HPP as an alternative to the thermal treatment to process crab meat. Industrial relevance High pressure processing (HPP) technology has been successfully applied to several seafood products. However, it is important to study the effect of HPP on the food components, mainly proteins in the crab meat to optimize the processing parameters to get high-quality products. In the present study, the benefit of using HPP as an alternative to the commercial thermal processing for extraction of crab meat has been confirmed. Applying 600 MPa (10 °C/5 min) to the whole blue crab resulted in a higher yield of extracted crab meat compared with the other treatments. However, using a range of 100–300 MPa (10 °C/5 min) also increases the yielding of extracted crab meat when compared to the thermal process, and moreover, the extraction procedure is faster. The quality and the functional properties of the crab meat with fresh appearance is preserved after the treatment at 100 MPa. These results could promote subsequent applications of pressurized crab meat in the crab industry, especially with the HPP treatments in a range between 100 and 300 MPa.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)323-329
Number of pages290
JournalInnovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2017

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crab meat
Brachyura
crabs
Callinectes sapidus
Meats
high pressure treatment
Meat
meat
proteins
Proteins
Pressure
Processing
Denaturation
biopolymer denaturation
Hot Temperature
denaturation
myofibrillar proteins
heat treatment
Thermal processing (foods)
Heat treatment

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Martínez, M. A. ; Velazquez, G. ; Cando, D. ; Núñez-Flores, R. ; Borderías, A. J. ; Moreno, H. M. / Effects of high pressure processing on protein fractions of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) meat. In: Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies. 2017 ; pp. 323-329.
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abstract = "{\circledC} 2017 Elsevier Ltd The studies about the effect of high pressure processing (HPP) on the myofibrillar proteins of crab meat are scarce in the literature. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of high pressure processing (HPP) at 100, 300 and 600 MPa (10 °C/5 min) on the muscular protein fractions of blue crab meat (Callinectes sapidus) and compares the effect of high pressure treatments and the thermal cooking process on the yielding of crab meat. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis of raw crab meat showed two peaks at 48.18 and 76.76 °C corresponding to myosin and actin denaturation. The increasing in the pressure level resulted in a decrease in denaturation enthalpy of both proteins. Data from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated changes in the secondary protein structures in which a reduction in α-helix and an increase in β-turn were observed as a result of denaturation induced by HPP. Electrophoresis analysis (SDS-PAGE) showed myofibrillar protein denaturation as the pressure level increased. The HPP at 100 and 300 MPa resulted in a significant increase in the yielding of meat extracted when compared to the thermal treatment (90 °C/20 min). Higher sensory scores were obtained in 300 and 600 MPa suggesting higher acceptance. Results suggest the feasibility of applying HPP as an alternative to the thermal treatment to process crab meat. Industrial relevance High pressure processing (HPP) technology has been successfully applied to several seafood products. However, it is important to study the effect of HPP on the food components, mainly proteins in the crab meat to optimize the processing parameters to get high-quality products. In the present study, the benefit of using HPP as an alternative to the commercial thermal processing for extraction of crab meat has been confirmed. Applying 600 MPa (10 °C/5 min) to the whole blue crab resulted in a higher yield of extracted crab meat compared with the other treatments. However, using a range of 100–300 MPa (10 °C/5 min) also increases the yielding of extracted crab meat when compared to the thermal process, and moreover, the extraction procedure is faster. The quality and the functional properties of the crab meat with fresh appearance is preserved after the treatment at 100 MPa. These results could promote subsequent applications of pressurized crab meat in the crab industry, especially with the HPP treatments in a range between 100 and 300 MPa.",
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Effects of high pressure processing on protein fractions of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) meat. / Martínez, M. A.; Velazquez, G.; Cando, D.; Núñez-Flores, R.; Borderías, A. J.; Moreno, H. M.

In: Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies, 01.06.2017, p. 323-329.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of high pressure processing on protein fractions of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) meat

AU - Martínez, M. A.

AU - Velazquez, G.

AU - Cando, D.

AU - Núñez-Flores, R.

AU - Borderías, A. J.

AU - Moreno, H. M.

PY - 2017/6/1

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N2 - © 2017 Elsevier Ltd The studies about the effect of high pressure processing (HPP) on the myofibrillar proteins of crab meat are scarce in the literature. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of high pressure processing (HPP) at 100, 300 and 600 MPa (10 °C/5 min) on the muscular protein fractions of blue crab meat (Callinectes sapidus) and compares the effect of high pressure treatments and the thermal cooking process on the yielding of crab meat. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis of raw crab meat showed two peaks at 48.18 and 76.76 °C corresponding to myosin and actin denaturation. The increasing in the pressure level resulted in a decrease in denaturation enthalpy of both proteins. Data from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated changes in the secondary protein structures in which a reduction in α-helix and an increase in β-turn were observed as a result of denaturation induced by HPP. Electrophoresis analysis (SDS-PAGE) showed myofibrillar protein denaturation as the pressure level increased. The HPP at 100 and 300 MPa resulted in a significant increase in the yielding of meat extracted when compared to the thermal treatment (90 °C/20 min). Higher sensory scores were obtained in 300 and 600 MPa suggesting higher acceptance. Results suggest the feasibility of applying HPP as an alternative to the thermal treatment to process crab meat. Industrial relevance High pressure processing (HPP) technology has been successfully applied to several seafood products. However, it is important to study the effect of HPP on the food components, mainly proteins in the crab meat to optimize the processing parameters to get high-quality products. In the present study, the benefit of using HPP as an alternative to the commercial thermal processing for extraction of crab meat has been confirmed. Applying 600 MPa (10 °C/5 min) to the whole blue crab resulted in a higher yield of extracted crab meat compared with the other treatments. However, using a range of 100–300 MPa (10 °C/5 min) also increases the yielding of extracted crab meat when compared to the thermal process, and moreover, the extraction procedure is faster. The quality and the functional properties of the crab meat with fresh appearance is preserved after the treatment at 100 MPa. These results could promote subsequent applications of pressurized crab meat in the crab industry, especially with the HPP treatments in a range between 100 and 300 MPa.

AB - © 2017 Elsevier Ltd The studies about the effect of high pressure processing (HPP) on the myofibrillar proteins of crab meat are scarce in the literature. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of high pressure processing (HPP) at 100, 300 and 600 MPa (10 °C/5 min) on the muscular protein fractions of blue crab meat (Callinectes sapidus) and compares the effect of high pressure treatments and the thermal cooking process on the yielding of crab meat. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis of raw crab meat showed two peaks at 48.18 and 76.76 °C corresponding to myosin and actin denaturation. The increasing in the pressure level resulted in a decrease in denaturation enthalpy of both proteins. Data from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated changes in the secondary protein structures in which a reduction in α-helix and an increase in β-turn were observed as a result of denaturation induced by HPP. Electrophoresis analysis (SDS-PAGE) showed myofibrillar protein denaturation as the pressure level increased. The HPP at 100 and 300 MPa resulted in a significant increase in the yielding of meat extracted when compared to the thermal treatment (90 °C/20 min). Higher sensory scores were obtained in 300 and 600 MPa suggesting higher acceptance. Results suggest the feasibility of applying HPP as an alternative to the thermal treatment to process crab meat. Industrial relevance High pressure processing (HPP) technology has been successfully applied to several seafood products. However, it is important to study the effect of HPP on the food components, mainly proteins in the crab meat to optimize the processing parameters to get high-quality products. In the present study, the benefit of using HPP as an alternative to the commercial thermal processing for extraction of crab meat has been confirmed. Applying 600 MPa (10 °C/5 min) to the whole blue crab resulted in a higher yield of extracted crab meat compared with the other treatments. However, using a range of 100–300 MPa (10 °C/5 min) also increases the yielding of extracted crab meat when compared to the thermal process, and moreover, the extraction procedure is faster. The quality and the functional properties of the crab meat with fresh appearance is preserved after the treatment at 100 MPa. These results could promote subsequent applications of pressurized crab meat in the crab industry, especially with the HPP treatments in a range between 100 and 300 MPa.

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