Associations among rhizobial chromosomal background, nod genes, and host plants based on the analysis of symbiosis of indigenous rhizobia and wild legumes native to Xinjiang

Tian Xu Han, Chang Fu Tian, En Tao Wang, Wen Xin Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The associations among rhizobia chromosomal background, nodulation genes, legume plants, and geographical regions are very attractive but still unclear. To address this question, we analyzed the interactions among rhizobia rDNA genotypes, nodC genotypes, legume genera, as well as geographical regions in the present study. Complex relationships were observed among them, which may be the genuine nature of their associations. The statistical analyses indicate that legume plant is the key factor shaping both rhizobia genetic and symbiotic diversity. In the most cases of our results, the nodC lineages are clearly associated with rhizobial genomic species, demonstrating that nodulation genes have co-evolved with chromosomal background, though the lateral transfer of nodulation genes occurred in some cases in a minority. Our results also support the hypothesis that the endemic rhizobial populations to a certain geographical area prefer to have a wide spectrum of hosts, which might be an important event for the success of both legumes and rhizobia in an isolated region. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)311-323
Number of pages278
JournalMicrobial Ecology
DOIs
StatePublished - 14 May 2010

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rhizobacterium
symbiosis
Rhizobium
host plant
Geographical regions
nodulation
host plants
legumes
Genes
China
gene
geographical region
genotype
genes
genomics
analysis
Industry

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title = "Associations among rhizobial chromosomal background, nod genes, and host plants based on the analysis of symbiosis of indigenous rhizobia and wild legumes native to Xinjiang",
abstract = "The associations among rhizobia chromosomal background, nodulation genes, legume plants, and geographical regions are very attractive but still unclear. To address this question, we analyzed the interactions among rhizobia rDNA genotypes, nodC genotypes, legume genera, as well as geographical regions in the present study. Complex relationships were observed among them, which may be the genuine nature of their associations. The statistical analyses indicate that legume plant is the key factor shaping both rhizobia genetic and symbiotic diversity. In the most cases of our results, the nodC lineages are clearly associated with rhizobial genomic species, demonstrating that nodulation genes have co-evolved with chromosomal background, though the lateral transfer of nodulation genes occurred in some cases in a minority. Our results also support the hypothesis that the endemic rhizobial populations to a certain geographical area prefer to have a wide spectrum of hosts, which might be an important event for the success of both legumes and rhizobia in an isolated region. {\circledC} 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.",
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Associations among rhizobial chromosomal background, nod genes, and host plants based on the analysis of symbiosis of indigenous rhizobia and wild legumes native to Xinjiang. / Han, Tian Xu; Tian, Chang Fu; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin.

In: Microbial Ecology, 14.05.2010, p. 311-323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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AU - Han, Tian Xu

AU - Tian, Chang Fu

AU - Wang, En Tao

AU - Chen, Wen Xin

PY - 2010/5/14

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N2 - The associations among rhizobia chromosomal background, nodulation genes, legume plants, and geographical regions are very attractive but still unclear. To address this question, we analyzed the interactions among rhizobia rDNA genotypes, nodC genotypes, legume genera, as well as geographical regions in the present study. Complex relationships were observed among them, which may be the genuine nature of their associations. The statistical analyses indicate that legume plant is the key factor shaping both rhizobia genetic and symbiotic diversity. In the most cases of our results, the nodC lineages are clearly associated with rhizobial genomic species, demonstrating that nodulation genes have co-evolved with chromosomal background, though the lateral transfer of nodulation genes occurred in some cases in a minority. Our results also support the hypothesis that the endemic rhizobial populations to a certain geographical area prefer to have a wide spectrum of hosts, which might be an important event for the success of both legumes and rhizobia in an isolated region. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

AB - The associations among rhizobia chromosomal background, nodulation genes, legume plants, and geographical regions are very attractive but still unclear. To address this question, we analyzed the interactions among rhizobia rDNA genotypes, nodC genotypes, legume genera, as well as geographical regions in the present study. Complex relationships were observed among them, which may be the genuine nature of their associations. The statistical analyses indicate that legume plant is the key factor shaping both rhizobia genetic and symbiotic diversity. In the most cases of our results, the nodC lineages are clearly associated with rhizobial genomic species, demonstrating that nodulation genes have co-evolved with chromosomal background, though the lateral transfer of nodulation genes occurred in some cases in a minority. Our results also support the hypothesis that the endemic rhizobial populations to a certain geographical area prefer to have a wide spectrum of hosts, which might be an important event for the success of both legumes and rhizobia in an isolated region. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

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