An efficient protocol for in vitro propagation of the wild legume Cicer microphyllum Benth., a crop wild relative of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

Rupesh Kumar Singh, Sivalingam Anandhan, Luz María García-Pérez, Eliel Ruiz-May, Eusebio Nava Pérez, Francisco Roberto Quiroz-Figueroa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

© 2019, The Society for In Vitro Biology. Cicer microphyllum Benth. is a wild legume that is adapted to the extremely adverse climatic conditions of the cold Himalayan deserts. This rare species is a crop wild relative (CWR) that could be used for chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) breeding programs to improve abiotic stress tolerance. However, the availability of C. microphyllum biological material is very limited due to its high altitude and remote location. These factors make in vitro plant tissue culture an excellent alternative for the conservation and propagation of this species. In this study, an efficient and reproducible in vitro regeneration protocol was established for C. microphyllum. This process enabled the regeneration of multiple shoots through indirect organogenesis from excised embryos. In addition, the effects of combinations of auxin and cytokinin concentrations in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium were tested. The highest percentage of callus induction was observed on MS with α-Naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP), and the addition of AgNO 3 to MS with NAA and BAP significantly improved shoot morphogenesis. The highest root percentage was observed on half-strength MS with Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA). Regenerated plantlets had a 65% survival rate 25 d after transplanting to garden soil, vermiculite, and vermicompost (1:1:1) potting mix. This protocol can be routinely used in large-scale propagation and possibly in germplasm conservation of this rare and important CWR species for additional use in chickpea breeding programs.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)9-14
Number of pages7
JournalIn Vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology - Plant
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Feb 2019

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Cicer
crops
wild relatives
Cicer arietinum
regeneration
Fabaceae
naphthaleneacetic acid
conservation
auxins
legumes
Naphthaleneacetic Acids
vermiculite
acids
N-benzyladenine
vermicomposts
shoots
in vitro regeneration
propagation
butyric acid
deserts

Cite this

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title = "An efficient protocol for in vitro propagation of the wild legume Cicer microphyllum Benth., a crop wild relative of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)",
abstract = "{\circledC} 2019, The Society for In Vitro Biology. Cicer microphyllum Benth. is a wild legume that is adapted to the extremely adverse climatic conditions of the cold Himalayan deserts. This rare species is a crop wild relative (CWR) that could be used for chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) breeding programs to improve abiotic stress tolerance. However, the availability of C. microphyllum biological material is very limited due to its high altitude and remote location. These factors make in vitro plant tissue culture an excellent alternative for the conservation and propagation of this species. In this study, an efficient and reproducible in vitro regeneration protocol was established for C. microphyllum. This process enabled the regeneration of multiple shoots through indirect organogenesis from excised embryos. In addition, the effects of combinations of auxin and cytokinin concentrations in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium were tested. The highest percentage of callus induction was observed on MS with α-Naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP), and the addition of AgNO 3 to MS with NAA and BAP significantly improved shoot morphogenesis. The highest root percentage was observed on half-strength MS with Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA). Regenerated plantlets had a 65{\%} survival rate 25 d after transplanting to garden soil, vermiculite, and vermicompost (1:1:1) potting mix. This protocol can be routinely used in large-scale propagation and possibly in germplasm conservation of this rare and important CWR species for additional use in chickpea breeding programs.",
author = "Singh, {Rupesh Kumar} and Sivalingam Anandhan and Garc{\'i}a-P{\'e}rez, {Luz Mar{\'i}a} and Eliel Ruiz-May and {Nava P{\'e}rez}, Eusebio and Quiroz-Figueroa, {Francisco Roberto}",
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An efficient protocol for in vitro propagation of the wild legume Cicer microphyllum Benth., a crop wild relative of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). / Singh, Rupesh Kumar; Anandhan, Sivalingam; García-Pérez, Luz María; Ruiz-May, Eliel; Nava Pérez, Eusebio; Quiroz-Figueroa, Francisco Roberto.

In: In Vitro Cellular and Developmental Biology - Plant, 15.02.2019, p. 9-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - An efficient protocol for in vitro propagation of the wild legume Cicer microphyllum Benth., a crop wild relative of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

AU - Singh, Rupesh Kumar

AU - Anandhan, Sivalingam

AU - García-Pérez, Luz María

AU - Ruiz-May, Eliel

AU - Nava Pérez, Eusebio

AU - Quiroz-Figueroa, Francisco Roberto

PY - 2019/2/15

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N2 - © 2019, The Society for In Vitro Biology. Cicer microphyllum Benth. is a wild legume that is adapted to the extremely adverse climatic conditions of the cold Himalayan deserts. This rare species is a crop wild relative (CWR) that could be used for chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) breeding programs to improve abiotic stress tolerance. However, the availability of C. microphyllum biological material is very limited due to its high altitude and remote location. These factors make in vitro plant tissue culture an excellent alternative for the conservation and propagation of this species. In this study, an efficient and reproducible in vitro regeneration protocol was established for C. microphyllum. This process enabled the regeneration of multiple shoots through indirect organogenesis from excised embryos. In addition, the effects of combinations of auxin and cytokinin concentrations in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium were tested. The highest percentage of callus induction was observed on MS with α-Naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP), and the addition of AgNO 3 to MS with NAA and BAP significantly improved shoot morphogenesis. The highest root percentage was observed on half-strength MS with Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA). Regenerated plantlets had a 65% survival rate 25 d after transplanting to garden soil, vermiculite, and vermicompost (1:1:1) potting mix. This protocol can be routinely used in large-scale propagation and possibly in germplasm conservation of this rare and important CWR species for additional use in chickpea breeding programs.

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