Would increased interstitial fluid flow through in situ mechanical stimulation enhance bone remodeling?

J. E. Letechipia, A. Alessi, G. Rodriguez, J. Asbun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bone accommodates to changes in its functional environment ensuring that sufficient skeletal mass is appropriately positioned to withstand the mechanical loads that result from functional activities. Increasing physical activity will result in increased bone mass, while the removal of functional loading would result in bone loss. Bone is a composite material made up of a collagen-hydroxyapatite matrix and a complex network of lacunae-canaliculi channels occupied by osteocyte and osteoblast processes, immersed in interstitial fluid. There are strong indications that changes in interstitial fluid flow velocity or pressure are the means by which an external load signal is communicated to the cell. In vitro studies indicate that shear stress, induced by interstitial fluid flow, is a potent bone cell behavior regulator. One of the forms of altering interstitial fluid flow is through the mechanical deformation of skeletal tissue in response to applied loads. Other methods include increased intramedullary pressure, negative-pressure tissue regeneration, or external mechanical stimulation. Analysis of these methods poses the question of process effectiveness. The efficacy of each method theoretically will depend on the mechanical efficiency of transmitting an external load and converting it into changes in interstitial fluid flow. In this paper, we combine recent knowledge on the effect of the bone's interstitial fluid flow, different fluid patterns, the role of gap junctions, and the concept of mechanical effectiveness of different methods that influence interstitial fluid flow within bone, and we hypothesize that the efficiency of bone remodeling can be improved if a small mechanical percussion device could be placed directly in contact with the bone, thus inducing local interstitial fluid flow variations. Enhancement of bone repair and remodeling through controlled interstitial fluid flow possesses many clinical applications. Further investigations and in vivo experiments are required. Practical methods and clinical apparatuses need to be conceived and developed to validate and facilitate the clinical use of this technique. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)196-198
Number of pages176
JournalMedical Hypotheses
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2010

Fingerprint

Bone Remodeling
Extracellular Fluid
Bone and Bones
Pressure
Mechanical Phenomena
Percussion
Osteocytes
Gap Junctions
Durapatite
Osteoblasts
Regeneration
Collagen
Equipment and Supplies

Cite this

@article{7219e05ea491443e9715d467b7ddf1e9,
title = "Would increased interstitial fluid flow through in situ mechanical stimulation enhance bone remodeling?",
abstract = "Bone accommodates to changes in its functional environment ensuring that sufficient skeletal mass is appropriately positioned to withstand the mechanical loads that result from functional activities. Increasing physical activity will result in increased bone mass, while the removal of functional loading would result in bone loss. Bone is a composite material made up of a collagen-hydroxyapatite matrix and a complex network of lacunae-canaliculi channels occupied by osteocyte and osteoblast processes, immersed in interstitial fluid. There are strong indications that changes in interstitial fluid flow velocity or pressure are the means by which an external load signal is communicated to the cell. In vitro studies indicate that shear stress, induced by interstitial fluid flow, is a potent bone cell behavior regulator. One of the forms of altering interstitial fluid flow is through the mechanical deformation of skeletal tissue in response to applied loads. Other methods include increased intramedullary pressure, negative-pressure tissue regeneration, or external mechanical stimulation. Analysis of these methods poses the question of process effectiveness. The efficacy of each method theoretically will depend on the mechanical efficiency of transmitting an external load and converting it into changes in interstitial fluid flow. In this paper, we combine recent knowledge on the effect of the bone's interstitial fluid flow, different fluid patterns, the role of gap junctions, and the concept of mechanical effectiveness of different methods that influence interstitial fluid flow within bone, and we hypothesize that the efficiency of bone remodeling can be improved if a small mechanical percussion device could be placed directly in contact with the bone, thus inducing local interstitial fluid flow variations. Enhancement of bone repair and remodeling through controlled interstitial fluid flow possesses many clinical applications. Further investigations and in vivo experiments are required. Practical methods and clinical apparatuses need to be conceived and developed to validate and facilitate the clinical use of this technique. {\circledC} 2010 Elsevier Ltd.",
author = "Letechipia, {J. E.} and A. Alessi and G. Rodriguez and J. Asbun",
year = "2010",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.mehy.2010.02.021",
language = "American English",
pages = "196--198",
journal = "Medical Hypotheses",
issn = "0306-9877",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",

}

Would increased interstitial fluid flow through in situ mechanical stimulation enhance bone remodeling? / Letechipia, J. E.; Alessi, A.; Rodriguez, G.; Asbun, J.

In: Medical Hypotheses, 01.08.2010, p. 196-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Would increased interstitial fluid flow through in situ mechanical stimulation enhance bone remodeling?

AU - Letechipia, J. E.

AU - Alessi, A.

AU - Rodriguez, G.

AU - Asbun, J.

PY - 2010/8/1

Y1 - 2010/8/1

N2 - Bone accommodates to changes in its functional environment ensuring that sufficient skeletal mass is appropriately positioned to withstand the mechanical loads that result from functional activities. Increasing physical activity will result in increased bone mass, while the removal of functional loading would result in bone loss. Bone is a composite material made up of a collagen-hydroxyapatite matrix and a complex network of lacunae-canaliculi channels occupied by osteocyte and osteoblast processes, immersed in interstitial fluid. There are strong indications that changes in interstitial fluid flow velocity or pressure are the means by which an external load signal is communicated to the cell. In vitro studies indicate that shear stress, induced by interstitial fluid flow, is a potent bone cell behavior regulator. One of the forms of altering interstitial fluid flow is through the mechanical deformation of skeletal tissue in response to applied loads. Other methods include increased intramedullary pressure, negative-pressure tissue regeneration, or external mechanical stimulation. Analysis of these methods poses the question of process effectiveness. The efficacy of each method theoretically will depend on the mechanical efficiency of transmitting an external load and converting it into changes in interstitial fluid flow. In this paper, we combine recent knowledge on the effect of the bone's interstitial fluid flow, different fluid patterns, the role of gap junctions, and the concept of mechanical effectiveness of different methods that influence interstitial fluid flow within bone, and we hypothesize that the efficiency of bone remodeling can be improved if a small mechanical percussion device could be placed directly in contact with the bone, thus inducing local interstitial fluid flow variations. Enhancement of bone repair and remodeling through controlled interstitial fluid flow possesses many clinical applications. Further investigations and in vivo experiments are required. Practical methods and clinical apparatuses need to be conceived and developed to validate and facilitate the clinical use of this technique. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

AB - Bone accommodates to changes in its functional environment ensuring that sufficient skeletal mass is appropriately positioned to withstand the mechanical loads that result from functional activities. Increasing physical activity will result in increased bone mass, while the removal of functional loading would result in bone loss. Bone is a composite material made up of a collagen-hydroxyapatite matrix and a complex network of lacunae-canaliculi channels occupied by osteocyte and osteoblast processes, immersed in interstitial fluid. There are strong indications that changes in interstitial fluid flow velocity or pressure are the means by which an external load signal is communicated to the cell. In vitro studies indicate that shear stress, induced by interstitial fluid flow, is a potent bone cell behavior regulator. One of the forms of altering interstitial fluid flow is through the mechanical deformation of skeletal tissue in response to applied loads. Other methods include increased intramedullary pressure, negative-pressure tissue regeneration, or external mechanical stimulation. Analysis of these methods poses the question of process effectiveness. The efficacy of each method theoretically will depend on the mechanical efficiency of transmitting an external load and converting it into changes in interstitial fluid flow. In this paper, we combine recent knowledge on the effect of the bone's interstitial fluid flow, different fluid patterns, the role of gap junctions, and the concept of mechanical effectiveness of different methods that influence interstitial fluid flow within bone, and we hypothesize that the efficiency of bone remodeling can be improved if a small mechanical percussion device could be placed directly in contact with the bone, thus inducing local interstitial fluid flow variations. Enhancement of bone repair and remodeling through controlled interstitial fluid flow possesses many clinical applications. Further investigations and in vivo experiments are required. Practical methods and clinical apparatuses need to be conceived and developed to validate and facilitate the clinical use of this technique. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

UR - https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=77954311118&origin=inward

UR - https://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=77954311118&origin=inward

U2 - 10.1016/j.mehy.2010.02.021

DO - 10.1016/j.mehy.2010.02.021

M3 - Article

C2 - 20227836

SP - 196

EP - 198

JO - Medical Hypotheses

JF - Medical Hypotheses

SN - 0306-9877

ER -