The differential effect of haloperidol and repetitive induction on four immobility responses in mouse and guinea pig

T. Fregoso-Aguilar, T. Urióstegui, S. Zamudio, Fidel De La Cruz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The modification by haloperidol and repetitive induction on four immobility responses - tonic immobility, cataleptic immobility, immobility by clamping the neck and dorsal immobility - were compared in mice and guinea pigs. Without drug, three out of four responses (cataleptic, neck clamp and dorsal immobility) were induced in mice; guinea pigs displayed all four responses. Haloperidol (5 mg/kg i.p.) potentiated the three responses shown by mice, but did not potentiate the four responses in guinea pigs. In both undrugged and haloperidol-treated mice, only the cataleptic immobility response was potentiated by repetition. In guinea pigs, none of the four immobility responses was affected due to repetition, haloperidol or a combination of both. These data are discussed, considering that, although these immobility responses could be mediated by the same neurotransmitters (e.g. dopamine), they are possibly expressed in a differential manner as a function of the kind of stimulus used to trigger the response, characteristics of the species and, in some immobility responses such as cataleptic immobility, as a function of their interaction with habituation or another learning-like process. © 2002 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)253-260
Number of pages226
JournalBehavioural Pharmacology
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Haloperidol
Tonic Immobility Response
Guinea Pigs
Neck
Constriction
Neurotransmitter Agents
Dopamine
Learning
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Cite this

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The differential effect of haloperidol and repetitive induction on four immobility responses in mouse and guinea pig. / Fregoso-Aguilar, T.; Urióstegui, T.; Zamudio, S.; De La Cruz, Fidel.

In: Behavioural Pharmacology, 01.01.2002, p. 253-260.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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