Spasmogenic and spasmolytic activities of Agastache mexicana ssp. mexicana and A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana methanolic extracts on the guinea pig ileum

Rosa Ventura-Martínez, Rodolfo Rodríguez, María Eva González-Trujano, Guadalupe E. Ángeles-López, Myrna Déciga-Campos, Claudia Gómez

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Abstract

© 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd Ethnopharmacological relevance Agastache mexicana has been used in traditional medicine for relief of abdominal pain and treatment of other diseases. Two subspecies have been identified: A. mexicana ssp. mexicana (AMM) and A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana (AMX) and both are used traditionally without distinction or in combination. Aim of the study To determine the effect of methanol extracts of A. mexicana ssp. mexicana and A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana on gut motility and their possible mechanism of action. Materials and methods The effect of AMM and AMX methanol extracts were tested on the spontaneous activity in the isolated guinea pig ileum and on tissues pre-contracted with KCl, electrical field stimulation (EFS) or ACh. In addition, the possible mechanism of action of each subspecies on gut motility was analyzed in the presence of hexametonium, indomethacin, L-NAME, verapamil, atropine or pyrylamine. A comparative chromatographic profile of these extracts was also done to indicate the most abundant flavonoids presents in methanol extracts of both subspecies. Results AMM, but not AMX, induced a contractile effect in the guinea pig ileum. This spasmogenic effect was partially inhibited by atropine, antagonist of muscarinic receptors; and pyrilamine, antagonist of H1 receptors. In contrast, AMX, but not AMM, diminished the contractions induced by KCl, EFS or ACh. The spasmolytic activity of AMX was partially inhibited by hexamethonium, ganglionic blocker; and indomethacin, inhibitor of the synthesis of prostaglandins; but not by L-NAME, inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. In addition, AMX diminished the maximal contraction induced by CaCl2 in a calcium-free medium. Chromatographic analyses of these methanol extracts showed the presence of acacetin and tilanin in both. Conclusions These results suggest that in folk medicine only AMX should be used as spasmolytic, and not in combination with AMM as traditionally occurs, due to the spasmogenic effects of the latter. In addition, activation of nicotinic receptors, prostaglandins and calcium channels, but not nitric oxide mechanisms, could be responsible for the spasmolytic activity of AMX. On the other hand, release of ACh and histamine could be involved in the spasmogenic effect induced by AMM. Acacetin and tilanin are present in methanol extracts of both subspecies and both flavonoids were more abundant in AMX than AMM. Our findings contribute to the validation of the traditional use of Agastache mexicana in relieving gastrointestinal disorders, but indicate that the subspecie that should be used for this effect is A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)58-65
Number of pages51
JournalJournal of Ethnopharmacology
DOIs
StatePublished - 20 Jan 2017

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Agastache
Parasympatholytics
Ileum
Methanol
Guinea Pigs
NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester
Traditional Medicine
Atropine
Flavonoids
Indomethacin
Electric Stimulation
Ganglionic Blockers
Pyrilamine
Prostaglandin Antagonists
Histamine H1 Receptors
Hexamethonium
Histamine Release
Nicotinic Receptors
Muscarinic Receptors
Calcium Channels

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Ventura-Martínez, Rosa ; Rodríguez, Rodolfo ; González-Trujano, María Eva ; Ángeles-López, Guadalupe E. ; Déciga-Campos, Myrna ; Gómez, Claudia. / Spasmogenic and spasmolytic activities of Agastache mexicana ssp. mexicana and A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana methanolic extracts on the guinea pig ileum. In: Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 2017 ; pp. 58-65.
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abstract = "{\circledC} 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd Ethnopharmacological relevance Agastache mexicana has been used in traditional medicine for relief of abdominal pain and treatment of other diseases. Two subspecies have been identified: A. mexicana ssp. mexicana (AMM) and A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana (AMX) and both are used traditionally without distinction or in combination. Aim of the study To determine the effect of methanol extracts of A. mexicana ssp. mexicana and A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana on gut motility and their possible mechanism of action. Materials and methods The effect of AMM and AMX methanol extracts were tested on the spontaneous activity in the isolated guinea pig ileum and on tissues pre-contracted with KCl, electrical field stimulation (EFS) or ACh. In addition, the possible mechanism of action of each subspecies on gut motility was analyzed in the presence of hexametonium, indomethacin, L-NAME, verapamil, atropine or pyrylamine. A comparative chromatographic profile of these extracts was also done to indicate the most abundant flavonoids presents in methanol extracts of both subspecies. Results AMM, but not AMX, induced a contractile effect in the guinea pig ileum. This spasmogenic effect was partially inhibited by atropine, antagonist of muscarinic receptors; and pyrilamine, antagonist of H1 receptors. In contrast, AMX, but not AMM, diminished the contractions induced by KCl, EFS or ACh. The spasmolytic activity of AMX was partially inhibited by hexamethonium, ganglionic blocker; and indomethacin, inhibitor of the synthesis of prostaglandins; but not by L-NAME, inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. In addition, AMX diminished the maximal contraction induced by CaCl2 in a calcium-free medium. Chromatographic analyses of these methanol extracts showed the presence of acacetin and tilanin in both. Conclusions These results suggest that in folk medicine only AMX should be used as spasmolytic, and not in combination with AMM as traditionally occurs, due to the spasmogenic effects of the latter. In addition, activation of nicotinic receptors, prostaglandins and calcium channels, but not nitric oxide mechanisms, could be responsible for the spasmolytic activity of AMX. On the other hand, release of ACh and histamine could be involved in the spasmogenic effect induced by AMM. Acacetin and tilanin are present in methanol extracts of both subspecies and both flavonoids were more abundant in AMX than AMM. Our findings contribute to the validation of the traditional use of Agastache mexicana in relieving gastrointestinal disorders, but indicate that the subspecie that should be used for this effect is A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana.",
author = "Rosa Ventura-Mart{\'i}nez and Rodolfo Rodr{\'i}guez and Gonz{\'a}lez-Trujano, {Mar{\'i}a Eva} and {\'A}ngeles-L{\'o}pez, {Guadalupe E.} and Myrna D{\'e}ciga-Campos and Claudia G{\'o}mez",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
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doi = "10.1016/j.jep.2016.12.023",
language = "American English",
pages = "58--65",
journal = "Journal of Ethnopharmacology",
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Spasmogenic and spasmolytic activities of Agastache mexicana ssp. mexicana and A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana methanolic extracts on the guinea pig ileum. / Ventura-Martínez, Rosa; Rodríguez, Rodolfo; González-Trujano, María Eva; Ángeles-López, Guadalupe E.; Déciga-Campos, Myrna; Gómez, Claudia.

In: Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 20.01.2017, p. 58-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Spasmogenic and spasmolytic activities of Agastache mexicana ssp. mexicana and A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana methanolic extracts on the guinea pig ileum

AU - Ventura-Martínez, Rosa

AU - Rodríguez, Rodolfo

AU - González-Trujano, María Eva

AU - Ángeles-López, Guadalupe E.

AU - Déciga-Campos, Myrna

AU - Gómez, Claudia

PY - 2017/1/20

Y1 - 2017/1/20

N2 - © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd Ethnopharmacological relevance Agastache mexicana has been used in traditional medicine for relief of abdominal pain and treatment of other diseases. Two subspecies have been identified: A. mexicana ssp. mexicana (AMM) and A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana (AMX) and both are used traditionally without distinction or in combination. Aim of the study To determine the effect of methanol extracts of A. mexicana ssp. mexicana and A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana on gut motility and their possible mechanism of action. Materials and methods The effect of AMM and AMX methanol extracts were tested on the spontaneous activity in the isolated guinea pig ileum and on tissues pre-contracted with KCl, electrical field stimulation (EFS) or ACh. In addition, the possible mechanism of action of each subspecies on gut motility was analyzed in the presence of hexametonium, indomethacin, L-NAME, verapamil, atropine or pyrylamine. A comparative chromatographic profile of these extracts was also done to indicate the most abundant flavonoids presents in methanol extracts of both subspecies. Results AMM, but not AMX, induced a contractile effect in the guinea pig ileum. This spasmogenic effect was partially inhibited by atropine, antagonist of muscarinic receptors; and pyrilamine, antagonist of H1 receptors. In contrast, AMX, but not AMM, diminished the contractions induced by KCl, EFS or ACh. The spasmolytic activity of AMX was partially inhibited by hexamethonium, ganglionic blocker; and indomethacin, inhibitor of the synthesis of prostaglandins; but not by L-NAME, inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. In addition, AMX diminished the maximal contraction induced by CaCl2 in a calcium-free medium. Chromatographic analyses of these methanol extracts showed the presence of acacetin and tilanin in both. Conclusions These results suggest that in folk medicine only AMX should be used as spasmolytic, and not in combination with AMM as traditionally occurs, due to the spasmogenic effects of the latter. In addition, activation of nicotinic receptors, prostaglandins and calcium channels, but not nitric oxide mechanisms, could be responsible for the spasmolytic activity of AMX. On the other hand, release of ACh and histamine could be involved in the spasmogenic effect induced by AMM. Acacetin and tilanin are present in methanol extracts of both subspecies and both flavonoids were more abundant in AMX than AMM. Our findings contribute to the validation of the traditional use of Agastache mexicana in relieving gastrointestinal disorders, but indicate that the subspecie that should be used for this effect is A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana.

AB - © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd Ethnopharmacological relevance Agastache mexicana has been used in traditional medicine for relief of abdominal pain and treatment of other diseases. Two subspecies have been identified: A. mexicana ssp. mexicana (AMM) and A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana (AMX) and both are used traditionally without distinction or in combination. Aim of the study To determine the effect of methanol extracts of A. mexicana ssp. mexicana and A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana on gut motility and their possible mechanism of action. Materials and methods The effect of AMM and AMX methanol extracts were tested on the spontaneous activity in the isolated guinea pig ileum and on tissues pre-contracted with KCl, electrical field stimulation (EFS) or ACh. In addition, the possible mechanism of action of each subspecies on gut motility was analyzed in the presence of hexametonium, indomethacin, L-NAME, verapamil, atropine or pyrylamine. A comparative chromatographic profile of these extracts was also done to indicate the most abundant flavonoids presents in methanol extracts of both subspecies. Results AMM, but not AMX, induced a contractile effect in the guinea pig ileum. This spasmogenic effect was partially inhibited by atropine, antagonist of muscarinic receptors; and pyrilamine, antagonist of H1 receptors. In contrast, AMX, but not AMM, diminished the contractions induced by KCl, EFS or ACh. The spasmolytic activity of AMX was partially inhibited by hexamethonium, ganglionic blocker; and indomethacin, inhibitor of the synthesis of prostaglandins; but not by L-NAME, inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. In addition, AMX diminished the maximal contraction induced by CaCl2 in a calcium-free medium. Chromatographic analyses of these methanol extracts showed the presence of acacetin and tilanin in both. Conclusions These results suggest that in folk medicine only AMX should be used as spasmolytic, and not in combination with AMM as traditionally occurs, due to the spasmogenic effects of the latter. In addition, activation of nicotinic receptors, prostaglandins and calcium channels, but not nitric oxide mechanisms, could be responsible for the spasmolytic activity of AMX. On the other hand, release of ACh and histamine could be involved in the spasmogenic effect induced by AMM. Acacetin and tilanin are present in methanol extracts of both subspecies and both flavonoids were more abundant in AMX than AMM. Our findings contribute to the validation of the traditional use of Agastache mexicana in relieving gastrointestinal disorders, but indicate that the subspecie that should be used for this effect is A. mexicana ssp. xolocotziana.

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