Solid particle erosion of AISI 304, 316 and 420 stainless steels

J. R. Laguna-Camacho, A. Marquina-Chávez, J. V. Méndez-Méndez, M. Vite-Torres, E. A. Gallardo-Hernández

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, solid particle erosion tests were carried out to evaluate the performance of AISI 304, 316 and 420 stainless steels in relation to this wear process. These materials have several industrial applications such as turbine blades, valves, hard tools, fasteners, piping, storage tanks, water components, food processing equipment, etc. An erosion test rig similar to that shown in ASTM G76-95 standard was used to perform the tests. The abrasive particle used was angular silicon carbide (SiC) with a particle size of 420-450. μm. Tests were carried out using different impact angles (30°, 45°, 60° and 90°) with a particle velocity of 24±2. m/s and an abrasive flow rate of 150±0.5. g/min. The room temperature during the tests was between 35. °C to 40. °C. The chemical composition of the tested materials was obtained by using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS). In addition, SEM images were used to identify the wear mechanisms. In this particular case, wear damage similar to brittle fracture with the detachment of large fragments was observed on the surfaces of AISI 304 and 316 stainless steels. Plastic deformation characterised by pitting and cutting action was also observed. In respect to AISI 420, it was only damaged by plastic deformation, with pitting and ploughing action, some random scratches and irregular indentations on its surface for all impact angles. The results showed that AISI 304 and 316 presented a higher erosion rate at 60°, whereas AISI 420 exhibited the higher erosion damage at 30°. Finally, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to compare the roughness of the surfaces before and after the tests at 30° and 90°, respectively. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)398-405
Number of pages357
JournalWear
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2013

Fingerprint

Stainless Steel
Plastics
erosion
stainless steels
Erosion
Stainless steel
Food Handling
Atomic Force Microscopy
Wear of materials
Pitting
Abrasives
Particle Size
Plastic deformation
pitting
X-Rays
abrasives
Equipment and Supplies
Food processing
Water tanks
plastic deformation

Cite this

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abstract = "In this study, solid particle erosion tests were carried out to evaluate the performance of AISI 304, 316 and 420 stainless steels in relation to this wear process. These materials have several industrial applications such as turbine blades, valves, hard tools, fasteners, piping, storage tanks, water components, food processing equipment, etc. An erosion test rig similar to that shown in ASTM G76-95 standard was used to perform the tests. The abrasive particle used was angular silicon carbide (SiC) with a particle size of 420-450. μm. Tests were carried out using different impact angles (30°, 45°, 60° and 90°) with a particle velocity of 24±2. m/s and an abrasive flow rate of 150±0.5. g/min. The room temperature during the tests was between 35. °C to 40. °C. The chemical composition of the tested materials was obtained by using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS). In addition, SEM images were used to identify the wear mechanisms. In this particular case, wear damage similar to brittle fracture with the detachment of large fragments was observed on the surfaces of AISI 304 and 316 stainless steels. Plastic deformation characterised by pitting and cutting action was also observed. In respect to AISI 420, it was only damaged by plastic deformation, with pitting and ploughing action, some random scratches and irregular indentations on its surface for all impact angles. The results showed that AISI 304 and 316 presented a higher erosion rate at 60°, whereas AISI 420 exhibited the higher erosion damage at 30°. Finally, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to compare the roughness of the surfaces before and after the tests at 30° and 90°, respectively. {\circledC} 2013 Elsevier B.V.",
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Solid particle erosion of AISI 304, 316 and 420 stainless steels. / Laguna-Camacho, J. R.; Marquina-Chávez, A.; Méndez-Méndez, J. V.; Vite-Torres, M.; Gallardo-Hernández, E. A.

In: Wear, 01.04.2013, p. 398-405.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Laguna-Camacho, J. R.

AU - Marquina-Chávez, A.

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