Noble gas atoms inside fullerenes

Martin Saunders, R. James Cross, Hugo A. Jiménez-Vázquez, Rinat Shimshi, Anthony Khong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

415 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Heating fullerenes at 650°C under 3000 atmospheres of the noble gases helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon introduces these atoms into the fullerene cages in about one in 1000 molecules. A "window" mechanism in which one or more of the carbon-carbon bonds of the cage is broken has been proposed to explain the process. The amount of gas inside the fullerenes can be measured by heating to 1000°C to expel the gases, which can then be measured by mass spectroscopy. Information obtained from the nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of helium-3-labeled fullerenes indicates that the magnetic field inside the cage is altered by aromatic ring current effects. Each higher fullerene isomer and each chemical derivative of a fullerene that has been studied so far has given a distinct helium nuclear magnetic resonance peak.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1693-1697
Number of pages1523
JournalScience
DOIs
StatePublished - 22 Mar 1996

Fingerprint

Fullerenes
Noble Gases
Inert gases
fullerenes
rare gases
Atoms
Helium
atoms
Carbon
Gases
helium
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Krypton
Neon
Heating
nuclear magnetic resonance
Xenon
helium isotopes
heating
ring currents

Cite this

Saunders, M., Cross, R. J., Jiménez-Vázquez, H. A., Shimshi, R., & Khong, A. (1996). Noble gas atoms inside fullerenes. Science, 1693-1697. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.271.5256.1693
Saunders, Martin ; Cross, R. James ; Jiménez-Vázquez, Hugo A. ; Shimshi, Rinat ; Khong, Anthony. / Noble gas atoms inside fullerenes. In: Science. 1996 ; pp. 1693-1697.
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Saunders, M, Cross, RJ, Jiménez-Vázquez, HA, Shimshi, R & Khong, A 1996, 'Noble gas atoms inside fullerenes', Science, pp. 1693-1697. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.271.5256.1693

Noble gas atoms inside fullerenes. / Saunders, Martin; Cross, R. James; Jiménez-Vázquez, Hugo A.; Shimshi, Rinat; Khong, Anthony.

In: Science, 22.03.1996, p. 1693-1697.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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