Naturally growing flora in abandoned mine tailings susceptible of being used in reclamation, Zimapán, Hidalgo, Mexico

Cecilia Elizondo, Marco A. Márquez-Linares, M. Liliana Marín-García, Pedro Joaquín Gutiérrez-Yurrita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Reclamation through planting of species resistant to mining waste has been widely used in mine tailing sites. This study took place in two mine tailings abandoned at different times and under different environmental conditions, in the San Francisco community, Zimapán, Hidalgo, México. The concept of reclamation is the course to redirect the ecological processes of an ecosystem to its former conditions, or at least to recover its ecological functions, minimizing the adverse effects caused by surface and underground mining operations. Mine lands are reclaimed to operational condition for alternate land uses and to reduce danger to public health or safety. The objective of the present research was to identify the species of flora that grow naturally in the mine sites, susceptible of being used in a future reclamation strategy of the site. Seventy-six plant species, grouped in 28 families and 59 genera, were found. Most of these species are generalists (native and exotic) and have proven their resistance to the soil conditions, water stress and climate changes, and are widely distributed.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)492-498
Number of pages442
JournalInterciencia
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2016

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Abandoned mines
abandoned mine
Reclamation
Tailings
tailings
flora
reclaimed land
stress change
Public health
water stress
Land use
generalist
Climate change
Ecosystems
public health
environmental conditions
safety
Soils
land use
climate change

Cite this

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title = "Naturally growing flora in abandoned mine tailings susceptible of being used in reclamation, Zimap{\'a}n, Hidalgo, Mexico",
abstract = "Reclamation through planting of species resistant to mining waste has been widely used in mine tailing sites. This study took place in two mine tailings abandoned at different times and under different environmental conditions, in the San Francisco community, Zimap{\'a}n, Hidalgo, M{\'e}xico. The concept of reclamation is the course to redirect the ecological processes of an ecosystem to its former conditions, or at least to recover its ecological functions, minimizing the adverse effects caused by surface and underground mining operations. Mine lands are reclaimed to operational condition for alternate land uses and to reduce danger to public health or safety. The objective of the present research was to identify the species of flora that grow naturally in the mine sites, susceptible of being used in a future reclamation strategy of the site. Seventy-six plant species, grouped in 28 families and 59 genera, were found. Most of these species are generalists (native and exotic) and have proven their resistance to the soil conditions, water stress and climate changes, and are widely distributed.",
author = "Cecilia Elizondo and M{\'a}rquez-Linares, {Marco A.} and Mar{\'i}n-Garc{\'i}a, {M. Liliana} and Guti{\'e}rrez-Yurrita, {Pedro Joaqu{\'i}n}",
year = "2016",
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Naturally growing flora in abandoned mine tailings susceptible of being used in reclamation, Zimapán, Hidalgo, Mexico. / Elizondo, Cecilia; Márquez-Linares, Marco A.; Marín-García, M. Liliana; Gutiérrez-Yurrita, Pedro Joaquín.

In: Interciencia, 01.07.2016, p. 492-498.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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