Natural genomic design in Sinorhizobium meliloti: Novel genomic architectures

Xianwu Guo, Margarita Flores, Patrick Mavingui, Sara Isabel Fuentes, Georgina Hernández, Guillermo Dávila, Rafael Palacios

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The complete nucleotide sequence of the genome of Sinorhizobium meliloti, the symbiont of alfalfa, was reported in 2001 by an international consortium of laboratories. The genome comprises a chromosome of 3.65 megabases (Mb) and two megaplasmids, pSymA and pSymB, of 1.35 Mb and 1.68 Mb, respectively. Based on the nucleotide sequence of the whole genome, we designed a pathway of consecutive rearrangements leading to novel genomic architectures. In a first step we obtained derivative strains containing two replicons; in a second step we obtained a strain containing the genetic information in one single replicon of 6.68 MB. From this last architecture we isolated revertants containing two replicons, and from these we could return to the original architecture showing the three replicons. We found that the relative frequency of excision of cointegrated replicons is higher at the site used for the cointegration than at other sites. This might conciliate two apparently opposed facts: the highly dynamic state of genomic architecture in S. meliloti and the common observation that different isolates and derived cellular clones of S. meliloti usually present the architecture of one chromosome and two distinct megaplasmids. Different aspects that must be considered to obtain full advantage of the strategy of natural genomic design are discussed.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1810-1817
Number of pages1628
JournalGenome Research
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Sinorhizobium meliloti
Replicon
Genome
Chromosomes
Medicago sativa
Clone Cells

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Guo, X., Flores, M., Mavingui, P., Fuentes, S. I., Hernández, G., Dávila, G., & Palacios, R. (2003). Natural genomic design in Sinorhizobium meliloti: Novel genomic architectures. Genome Research, 1810-1817.
Guo, Xianwu ; Flores, Margarita ; Mavingui, Patrick ; Fuentes, Sara Isabel ; Hernández, Georgina ; Dávila, Guillermo ; Palacios, Rafael. / Natural genomic design in Sinorhizobium meliloti: Novel genomic architectures. In: Genome Research. 2003 ; pp. 1810-1817.
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Guo, X, Flores, M, Mavingui, P, Fuentes, SI, Hernández, G, Dávila, G & Palacios, R 2003, 'Natural genomic design in Sinorhizobium meliloti: Novel genomic architectures', Genome Research, pp. 1810-1817.

Natural genomic design in Sinorhizobium meliloti: Novel genomic architectures. / Guo, Xianwu; Flores, Margarita; Mavingui, Patrick; Fuentes, Sara Isabel; Hernández, Georgina; Dávila, Guillermo; Palacios, Rafael.

In: Genome Research, 01.08.2003, p. 1810-1817.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Guo X, Flores M, Mavingui P, Fuentes SI, Hernández G, Dávila G et al. Natural genomic design in Sinorhizobium meliloti: Novel genomic architectures. Genome Research. 2003 Aug 1;1810-1817.