Myeloperoxidase binds to and kills Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites

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Abstract

During amebic invasion, neutrophils are a key component in either protecting against invading trophozoites or contributing to tissue damage. Upon degranulating or being lysed, neutrophils release toxic substances that can kill amebas as well as damage host tissue. In a previous study we identified a protein from nonspecifically stimulated peritoneal exudates of hamster that has peroxidase and marked amebicidal activity. In the current study we analyzed the in vitro amebicidal effect of purified hamster myeloperoxidase (MPO). The results demonstrate that MPO must bind directly to the surface of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites in order to carry out amebicidal activity by using the H2O2 produced by the amebas themselves. Myeloperoxidase-incubated amebas showed important morphological and ultrastructural alterations that increased with incubation time. Changes included an increase of vacuoles in the cytoplasm, a decrease of glycogen, alterations of nuclear morphology and disturbances in the plasma membrane culminating in complete ameba destruction. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)255-264
Number of pages228
JournalParasite Immunology
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2011

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Trophozoites
Entamoeba histolytica
Amoeba
Peroxidase
Cricetinae
Neutrophils
Poisons
Exudates and Transudates
Vacuoles
Glycogen
Cytoplasm
Cell Membrane
Proteins

Cite this

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title = "Myeloperoxidase binds to and kills Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites",
abstract = "During amebic invasion, neutrophils are a key component in either protecting against invading trophozoites or contributing to tissue damage. Upon degranulating or being lysed, neutrophils release toxic substances that can kill amebas as well as damage host tissue. In a previous study we identified a protein from nonspecifically stimulated peritoneal exudates of hamster that has peroxidase and marked amebicidal activity. In the current study we analyzed the in vitro amebicidal effect of purified hamster myeloperoxidase (MPO). The results demonstrate that MPO must bind directly to the surface of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites in order to carry out amebicidal activity by using the H2O2 produced by the amebas themselves. Myeloperoxidase-incubated amebas showed important morphological and ultrastructural alterations that increased with incubation time. Changes included an increase of vacuoles in the cytoplasm, a decrease of glycogen, alterations of nuclear morphology and disturbances in the plasma membrane culminating in complete ameba destruction. {\circledC} 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.",
author = "J. Pacheco-Y{\'e}pez and V. Rivera-Aguilar and E. Barbosa-Cabrera and {Rojas Hern{\'a}ndez}, S. and Jarillo-Luna, {R. A.} and R. Campos-Rodr{\'i}guez",
year = "2011",
month = "5",
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doi = "10.1111/j.1365-3024.2010.01275.x",
language = "American English",
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T1 - Myeloperoxidase binds to and kills Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites

AU - Pacheco-Yépez, J.

AU - Rivera-Aguilar, V.

AU - Barbosa-Cabrera, E.

AU - Rojas Hernández, S.

AU - Jarillo-Luna, R. A.

AU - Campos-Rodríguez, R.

PY - 2011/5/1

Y1 - 2011/5/1

N2 - During amebic invasion, neutrophils are a key component in either protecting against invading trophozoites or contributing to tissue damage. Upon degranulating or being lysed, neutrophils release toxic substances that can kill amebas as well as damage host tissue. In a previous study we identified a protein from nonspecifically stimulated peritoneal exudates of hamster that has peroxidase and marked amebicidal activity. In the current study we analyzed the in vitro amebicidal effect of purified hamster myeloperoxidase (MPO). The results demonstrate that MPO must bind directly to the surface of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites in order to carry out amebicidal activity by using the H2O2 produced by the amebas themselves. Myeloperoxidase-incubated amebas showed important morphological and ultrastructural alterations that increased with incubation time. Changes included an increase of vacuoles in the cytoplasm, a decrease of glycogen, alterations of nuclear morphology and disturbances in the plasma membrane culminating in complete ameba destruction. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

AB - During amebic invasion, neutrophils are a key component in either protecting against invading trophozoites or contributing to tissue damage. Upon degranulating or being lysed, neutrophils release toxic substances that can kill amebas as well as damage host tissue. In a previous study we identified a protein from nonspecifically stimulated peritoneal exudates of hamster that has peroxidase and marked amebicidal activity. In the current study we analyzed the in vitro amebicidal effect of purified hamster myeloperoxidase (MPO). The results demonstrate that MPO must bind directly to the surface of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites in order to carry out amebicidal activity by using the H2O2 produced by the amebas themselves. Myeloperoxidase-incubated amebas showed important morphological and ultrastructural alterations that increased with incubation time. Changes included an increase of vacuoles in the cytoplasm, a decrease of glycogen, alterations of nuclear morphology and disturbances in the plasma membrane culminating in complete ameba destruction. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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