Modification of actin, myosin and tubulin distribution during cytoplasmic granule movements associated with platelet adhesion

Doris Cerecedo, Roberto Stock, Sirenia González, Elba Reyes, Ricardo Mondragón

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objectives. Cytoskeletal elements determine the changes in platelet cell shape which occur during adhesion, aggregation and release of granular contents as part of the activation process. The aim of this study was to characterize the changes in the distribution of actin filaments, myosin and tubulin molecules during several stages of platelet adhesion to glass and their association with granule displacement, as assessed by confocal microscopy. Design and Methods. Platelets obtained from healthy donors were adhered to glass and cytoskeleton distribution was characterized and correlated to changes of cell shape and intracellular granule displacement by immunofluorescence assays and phase contrast microscopy. Treatment with specific cytoskeleton inhibitors such as cytochalasin D, butanedione monoxime and colchicine were used before and after the adhesion process. The spatial distribution of the cytoskeleton in association with cytoplasmic granules was analyzed in both confocal microscopy projections and three-dimensional images obtained by merging the respective projections. Results. Our experiments revealed that as platelets contact the substrate, a sequential and simultaneous rearrangement of actin filaments, myosin and tubulin molecules occurred and this was related to cell shape, as well as to movements of cytoplasmic granules. Treatment of platelets with cytoskeleton inhibitors, modified not only the target molecule but also other cytoskeletal components with consequent alterations in the studied platelet functions. Interpretation and Conclusions. During platelet adhesion to glass and granule displacement, a close spatial and functional relation between actin filaments, myosin molecules and microtubules was observed suggesting that these different cytoskeleton components interact in supporting the platelet functions here studied. ©2002, Ferrata Storti Foundation.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1165-1176
Number of pages1047
JournalHaematologica
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2002

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Cytoplasmic Granules
Myosins
Tubulin
Actins
Blood Platelets
Cytoskeleton
Cell Shape
Actin Cytoskeleton
Glass
Confocal Microscopy
Phase-Contrast Microscopy
Cytochalasin D
Three-Dimensional Imaging
Colchicine
Microtubules
Fluorescent Antibody Technique

Cite this

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title = "Modification of actin, myosin and tubulin distribution during cytoplasmic granule movements associated with platelet adhesion",
abstract = "Background and Objectives. Cytoskeletal elements determine the changes in platelet cell shape which occur during adhesion, aggregation and release of granular contents as part of the activation process. The aim of this study was to characterize the changes in the distribution of actin filaments, myosin and tubulin molecules during several stages of platelet adhesion to glass and their association with granule displacement, as assessed by confocal microscopy. Design and Methods. Platelets obtained from healthy donors were adhered to glass and cytoskeleton distribution was characterized and correlated to changes of cell shape and intracellular granule displacement by immunofluorescence assays and phase contrast microscopy. Treatment with specific cytoskeleton inhibitors such as cytochalasin D, butanedione monoxime and colchicine were used before and after the adhesion process. The spatial distribution of the cytoskeleton in association with cytoplasmic granules was analyzed in both confocal microscopy projections and three-dimensional images obtained by merging the respective projections. Results. Our experiments revealed that as platelets contact the substrate, a sequential and simultaneous rearrangement of actin filaments, myosin and tubulin molecules occurred and this was related to cell shape, as well as to movements of cytoplasmic granules. Treatment of platelets with cytoskeleton inhibitors, modified not only the target molecule but also other cytoskeletal components with consequent alterations in the studied platelet functions. Interpretation and Conclusions. During platelet adhesion to glass and granule displacement, a close spatial and functional relation between actin filaments, myosin molecules and microtubules was observed suggesting that these different cytoskeleton components interact in supporting the platelet functions here studied. {\circledC}2002, Ferrata Storti Foundation.",
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Modification of actin, myosin and tubulin distribution during cytoplasmic granule movements associated with platelet adhesion. / Cerecedo, Doris; Stock, Roberto; González, Sirenia; Reyes, Elba; Mondragón, Ricardo.

In: Haematologica, 01.11.2002, p. 1165-1176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Modification of actin, myosin and tubulin distribution during cytoplasmic granule movements associated with platelet adhesion

AU - Cerecedo, Doris

AU - Stock, Roberto

AU - González, Sirenia

AU - Reyes, Elba

AU - Mondragón, Ricardo

PY - 2002/11/1

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