Isolation of Mycobacterium mucogenicum from street-vended chili sauces: A potential source of human infection

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Abstract

Recently human illnesses due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have increased worldwide, but the sources of transmission have not been well established. Street-vended food is widely consumed in Mexico, and chili sauces are the most typical dressings for this food. Thus, we examined street-vended chili sauces as a possible source for NTM. Fifty-one street-vended chili sauces were collected in different areas of Mexico City during the spring of 2007. NTM were recovered from 6% (3 of 51) of samples, and in all cases the identified species was Mycobacterium mucogenicum. This mycobacterium has been associated with human illness; therefore, street-vended chili sauces are a potential source of NTM infection. Copyright ©, International Association for Food Protection.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)182-184
Number of pages163
JournalJournal of Food Protection
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2009

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Mycobacterium mucogenicum
Nontuberculous Mycobacteria
streets
sauces
Mycobacterium
infectious diseases
isolation
food
Mexico
Food
Nontuberculous Mycobacterium Infections
Infection
human diseases
infection
street foods
Bandages
mycobacterial diseases
food safety

Cite this

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title = "Isolation of Mycobacterium mucogenicum from street-vended chili sauces: A potential source of human infection",
abstract = "Recently human illnesses due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have increased worldwide, but the sources of transmission have not been well established. Street-vended food is widely consumed in Mexico, and chili sauces are the most typical dressings for this food. Thus, we examined street-vended chili sauces as a possible source for NTM. Fifty-one street-vended chili sauces were collected in different areas of Mexico City during the spring of 2007. NTM were recovered from 6{\%} (3 of 51) of samples, and in all cases the identified species was Mycobacterium mucogenicum. This mycobacterium has been associated with human illness; therefore, street-vended chili sauces are a potential source of NTM infection. Copyright {\circledC}, International Association for Food Protection.",
author = "Cerna-Cort{\'e}s, {Jorge F.} and Teresa Estrada-Garc{\'i}a and Gonz{\'a}lez-Y-Merchand, {Jorge A.}",
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N2 - Recently human illnesses due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have increased worldwide, but the sources of transmission have not been well established. Street-vended food is widely consumed in Mexico, and chili sauces are the most typical dressings for this food. Thus, we examined street-vended chili sauces as a possible source for NTM. Fifty-one street-vended chili sauces were collected in different areas of Mexico City during the spring of 2007. NTM were recovered from 6% (3 of 51) of samples, and in all cases the identified species was Mycobacterium mucogenicum. This mycobacterium has been associated with human illness; therefore, street-vended chili sauces are a potential source of NTM infection. Copyright ©, International Association for Food Protection.

AB - Recently human illnesses due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have increased worldwide, but the sources of transmission have not been well established. Street-vended food is widely consumed in Mexico, and chili sauces are the most typical dressings for this food. Thus, we examined street-vended chili sauces as a possible source for NTM. Fifty-one street-vended chili sauces were collected in different areas of Mexico City during the spring of 2007. NTM were recovered from 6% (3 of 51) of samples, and in all cases the identified species was Mycobacterium mucogenicum. This mycobacterium has been associated with human illness; therefore, street-vended chili sauces are a potential source of NTM infection. Copyright ©, International Association for Food Protection.

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