Isobolographic analysis of the antinociceptive interaction between ursolic acid and diclofenac or tramadol in mice

Myrna Déciga-Campos, Alejandra Cortés, Francisco Pellicer, Irene Díaz-Reval, María Eva González-Trujano

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Abstract

It is considered that natural products used in folk medicine can potentiate the effect of drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological interaction between ursolic acid, a triterpene isolated from herbal medicines to treat pain, and the analgesics diclofenac or tramadol. Individual dose-response curves of the antinociceptive effect of these compounds were built to calculate the ED50, as well as the pharmacological interaction, by using isobolographic analysis. All treatments decreased significantly and in a dose-dependent manner the writhing behavior with ED50 values of 103.50 ± 19.66, 20.54 ± 6.05, and 9.60 ± 1.69 mg/kg, for ursolic acid, diclofenac, and tramadol, respectively. An isobolographic analysis allowed the characterization of the pharmacological interaction produced by a fixed ratio combination of 1 : 1 and 1 : 3 of equi-effective doses of these compounds. Theoretical antinociceptive ED50 values of ursolic acid-diclofenac were 62.12 ± 10.28 and 41.43 ± 6.69 mg/kg, respectively, not statistically different from those obtained experimentally (44.52 ± 5.25 and 44.89 ± 49.05 mg/kg, respectively), reporting an additive interaction. Theoretical antinociceptive ED50 values of ursolic acid-tramadol (56.56 ± 9.87 and 33.08 ± 5.07 mg/kg, respectively) were significantly lower than those observed experimentally (138.36 ± 49.05 and 67.34 ± 18.98 mg/kg, respectively) reporting antagonism in this interaction. Antinociceptive response obtained from isobolograms in the writhing test was corroborated by using formalin test in mice. Adverse effects such as gastric damage in the ursolic acid-diclofenac combination did not increase in an additive form similarly as with antinociception. Conversely, sedative response was significantly increased in the ursolic acid-tramadol combination. As observed in the formalin test, the antagonism on the antinociceptive response between ursolic acid and tramadol (1 : 1) was not reverted in the presence of the opioid antagonist naltrexone (1 mg/kg, i. p.). These results provide evidence for a differential pharmacological interaction, in which ursolic acid does not interfere with the antinociceptive effect of diclofenac but antagonizes that obtained with tramadol in an independent opioid mechanism. Therefore, medicinal plants containing abundant presence of ursolic acid may also modify efficacy in the alternative combinations for the pain therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)139-145
Number of pages124
JournalPlanta Medica
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2014

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Tramadol
Diclofenac
Pharmacology
Pain Measurement
Formaldehyde
ursolic acid
Pain
Triterpenes
Naltrexone
Narcotic Antagonists
Herbal Medicine
Traditional Medicine
Medicinal Plants
Biological Products
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Opioid Analgesics
Medicine
Analgesics
Stomach

Cite this

Déciga-Campos, Myrna ; Cortés, Alejandra ; Pellicer, Francisco ; Díaz-Reval, Irene ; González-Trujano, María Eva. / Isobolographic analysis of the antinociceptive interaction between ursolic acid and diclofenac or tramadol in mice. In: Planta Medica. 2014 ; pp. 139-145.
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abstract = "It is considered that natural products used in folk medicine can potentiate the effect of drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological interaction between ursolic acid, a triterpene isolated from herbal medicines to treat pain, and the analgesics diclofenac or tramadol. Individual dose-response curves of the antinociceptive effect of these compounds were built to calculate the ED50, as well as the pharmacological interaction, by using isobolographic analysis. All treatments decreased significantly and in a dose-dependent manner the writhing behavior with ED50 values of 103.50 ± 19.66, 20.54 ± 6.05, and 9.60 ± 1.69 mg/kg, for ursolic acid, diclofenac, and tramadol, respectively. An isobolographic analysis allowed the characterization of the pharmacological interaction produced by a fixed ratio combination of 1 : 1 and 1 : 3 of equi-effective doses of these compounds. Theoretical antinociceptive ED50 values of ursolic acid-diclofenac were 62.12 ± 10.28 and 41.43 ± 6.69 mg/kg, respectively, not statistically different from those obtained experimentally (44.52 ± 5.25 and 44.89 ± 49.05 mg/kg, respectively), reporting an additive interaction. Theoretical antinociceptive ED50 values of ursolic acid-tramadol (56.56 ± 9.87 and 33.08 ± 5.07 mg/kg, respectively) were significantly lower than those observed experimentally (138.36 ± 49.05 and 67.34 ± 18.98 mg/kg, respectively) reporting antagonism in this interaction. Antinociceptive response obtained from isobolograms in the writhing test was corroborated by using formalin test in mice. Adverse effects such as gastric damage in the ursolic acid-diclofenac combination did not increase in an additive form similarly as with antinociception. Conversely, sedative response was significantly increased in the ursolic acid-tramadol combination. As observed in the formalin test, the antagonism on the antinociceptive response between ursolic acid and tramadol (1 : 1) was not reverted in the presence of the opioid antagonist naltrexone (1 mg/kg, i. p.). These results provide evidence for a differential pharmacological interaction, in which ursolic acid does not interfere with the antinociceptive effect of diclofenac but antagonizes that obtained with tramadol in an independent opioid mechanism. Therefore, medicinal plants containing abundant presence of ursolic acid may also modify efficacy in the alternative combinations for the pain therapy. {\circledC} Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.",
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Isobolographic analysis of the antinociceptive interaction between ursolic acid and diclofenac or tramadol in mice. / Déciga-Campos, Myrna; Cortés, Alejandra; Pellicer, Francisco; Díaz-Reval, Irene; González-Trujano, María Eva.

In: Planta Medica, 01.02.2014, p. 139-145.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Isobolographic analysis of the antinociceptive interaction between ursolic acid and diclofenac or tramadol in mice

AU - Déciga-Campos, Myrna

AU - Cortés, Alejandra

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AU - Díaz-Reval, Irene

AU - González-Trujano, María Eva

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N2 - It is considered that natural products used in folk medicine can potentiate the effect of drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological interaction between ursolic acid, a triterpene isolated from herbal medicines to treat pain, and the analgesics diclofenac or tramadol. Individual dose-response curves of the antinociceptive effect of these compounds were built to calculate the ED50, as well as the pharmacological interaction, by using isobolographic analysis. All treatments decreased significantly and in a dose-dependent manner the writhing behavior with ED50 values of 103.50 ± 19.66, 20.54 ± 6.05, and 9.60 ± 1.69 mg/kg, for ursolic acid, diclofenac, and tramadol, respectively. An isobolographic analysis allowed the characterization of the pharmacological interaction produced by a fixed ratio combination of 1 : 1 and 1 : 3 of equi-effective doses of these compounds. Theoretical antinociceptive ED50 values of ursolic acid-diclofenac were 62.12 ± 10.28 and 41.43 ± 6.69 mg/kg, respectively, not statistically different from those obtained experimentally (44.52 ± 5.25 and 44.89 ± 49.05 mg/kg, respectively), reporting an additive interaction. Theoretical antinociceptive ED50 values of ursolic acid-tramadol (56.56 ± 9.87 and 33.08 ± 5.07 mg/kg, respectively) were significantly lower than those observed experimentally (138.36 ± 49.05 and 67.34 ± 18.98 mg/kg, respectively) reporting antagonism in this interaction. Antinociceptive response obtained from isobolograms in the writhing test was corroborated by using formalin test in mice. Adverse effects such as gastric damage in the ursolic acid-diclofenac combination did not increase in an additive form similarly as with antinociception. Conversely, sedative response was significantly increased in the ursolic acid-tramadol combination. As observed in the formalin test, the antagonism on the antinociceptive response between ursolic acid and tramadol (1 : 1) was not reverted in the presence of the opioid antagonist naltrexone (1 mg/kg, i. p.). These results provide evidence for a differential pharmacological interaction, in which ursolic acid does not interfere with the antinociceptive effect of diclofenac but antagonizes that obtained with tramadol in an independent opioid mechanism. Therefore, medicinal plants containing abundant presence of ursolic acid may also modify efficacy in the alternative combinations for the pain therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

AB - It is considered that natural products used in folk medicine can potentiate the effect of drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological interaction between ursolic acid, a triterpene isolated from herbal medicines to treat pain, and the analgesics diclofenac or tramadol. Individual dose-response curves of the antinociceptive effect of these compounds were built to calculate the ED50, as well as the pharmacological interaction, by using isobolographic analysis. All treatments decreased significantly and in a dose-dependent manner the writhing behavior with ED50 values of 103.50 ± 19.66, 20.54 ± 6.05, and 9.60 ± 1.69 mg/kg, for ursolic acid, diclofenac, and tramadol, respectively. An isobolographic analysis allowed the characterization of the pharmacological interaction produced by a fixed ratio combination of 1 : 1 and 1 : 3 of equi-effective doses of these compounds. Theoretical antinociceptive ED50 values of ursolic acid-diclofenac were 62.12 ± 10.28 and 41.43 ± 6.69 mg/kg, respectively, not statistically different from those obtained experimentally (44.52 ± 5.25 and 44.89 ± 49.05 mg/kg, respectively), reporting an additive interaction. Theoretical antinociceptive ED50 values of ursolic acid-tramadol (56.56 ± 9.87 and 33.08 ± 5.07 mg/kg, respectively) were significantly lower than those observed experimentally (138.36 ± 49.05 and 67.34 ± 18.98 mg/kg, respectively) reporting antagonism in this interaction. Antinociceptive response obtained from isobolograms in the writhing test was corroborated by using formalin test in mice. Adverse effects such as gastric damage in the ursolic acid-diclofenac combination did not increase in an additive form similarly as with antinociception. Conversely, sedative response was significantly increased in the ursolic acid-tramadol combination. As observed in the formalin test, the antagonism on the antinociceptive response between ursolic acid and tramadol (1 : 1) was not reverted in the presence of the opioid antagonist naltrexone (1 mg/kg, i. p.). These results provide evidence for a differential pharmacological interaction, in which ursolic acid does not interfere with the antinociceptive effect of diclofenac but antagonizes that obtained with tramadol in an independent opioid mechanism. Therefore, medicinal plants containing abundant presence of ursolic acid may also modify efficacy in the alternative combinations for the pain therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

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