High-energy ball mill parameters used to obtain ultra-fine portland cement at laboratory level

Juan Carlos Arteaga-Arcos, Obed Arnoldo Chimal-Valencia, David Joaquin Delgado Hernández, Hernani Tiago Yee Madeira, Sebastián Diaz De La Torre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the most significant characteristics of ultra-fine cement (UFC) is its high fineness (maximum particle size below 787 μin. [20 μm]). This kind of cement is obtained once ordinary portland cement (OPC) is ground in common grinding devices; the main disadvantages of this type of processing are the long time spent in milling processing and the high production cost. Some novel grinding devices, such as high-energy ball mills (HEBMs), have been used as an alternative to the fine and ultra-fine grinding process, especially in the advanced materials processing research field; but this is not often used in cement research. The aim of this research was to study the different milling parameters (time, ballpowder ratio [b/p], and milling speed) used in OPC dry-milling processing and to determine the most suitable combination of these parameters to obtain UFC at the laboratory level. This combination was determined after the characterization of the processed cement powder. The carried-out characterization techniques used were chemical composition, crystallographic phase quantification, change of temperature during the hydration process, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images for the morphology of the milled cement. The optimal combination of parameters produced an UFC with a maximum particle size below 590 μin. (15 μm) and a Blaine specific surface area (BSSA) of over 9000 cm2/g. Copyright © 2011, American Concrete Intitute. All rights reserved.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)371-377
Number of pages333
JournalACI Materials Journal
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2011

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Ball mills
Portland cement
Cements
Particle Size
Research
Equipment and Supplies
Electron Scanning Microscopy
Powders
Processing
Costs and Cost Analysis
Particle size
Temperature
Grinding (comminution)
Specific surface area
Hydration
Concretes
Scanning electron microscopy
Chemical analysis
Costs

Cite this

Arteaga-Arcos, Juan Carlos ; Chimal-Valencia, Obed Arnoldo ; Hernández, David Joaquin Delgado ; Madeira, Hernani Tiago Yee ; De La Torre, Sebastián Diaz. / High-energy ball mill parameters used to obtain ultra-fine portland cement at laboratory level. In: ACI Materials Journal. 2011 ; pp. 371-377.
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High-energy ball mill parameters used to obtain ultra-fine portland cement at laboratory level. / Arteaga-Arcos, Juan Carlos; Chimal-Valencia, Obed Arnoldo; Hernández, David Joaquin Delgado; Madeira, Hernani Tiago Yee; De La Torre, Sebastián Diaz.

In: ACI Materials Journal, 01.07.2011, p. 371-377.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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