Genetic shifts in the transition from wild to farmed white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) population

Perla M. Hernández-Mendoza, Gaspar M. Parra-Bracamonte, Xochitl F. De La Rosa-Reyna, Omar Chassin-Noria, Ana M. Sifuentes-Rincón

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is one of the most important species related to sport hunting in northern Mexico. During the last decade, this species has been subjected to intensive breeding to achieve improvements in certain desired traits (i.e., antlers). This alleged intensive management of bringing originally wild populations into captivity might have harmful consequences on genetic diversity. In this short research paper we estimate and discuss the consequences of that transition, as assessed by a microsatellite genetic marker analysis. The results show that no short-term changes in genetic diversity parameters were promoted by captivity; however, a genetic diversity condition maintained by artificial genetic flow was identified, perhaps allowing for the required introgression of gene diversity into this closed population. A wider analysis is recommended and the implications are discussed. Within a realistic forecast of expanding sport hunting, the achievement of useful, pragmatic, and strict conservancy programs of this species, considering approaches such as those used here, will be necessary. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)3-8
Number of pages0
JournalInternational Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services and Management
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Jan 2014

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Odocoileus virginianus
sport hunting
deer
captivity
sport
genetic variation
hunting
antlers
introgression
genetic marker
wild population
Mexico
breeding
microsatellite repeats
genetic markers
gene
genetic diversity
genes
analysis

Cite this

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title = "Genetic shifts in the transition from wild to farmed white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) population",
abstract = "The white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is one of the most important species related to sport hunting in northern Mexico. During the last decade, this species has been subjected to intensive breeding to achieve improvements in certain desired traits (i.e., antlers). This alleged intensive management of bringing originally wild populations into captivity might have harmful consequences on genetic diversity. In this short research paper we estimate and discuss the consequences of that transition, as assessed by a microsatellite genetic marker analysis. The results show that no short-term changes in genetic diversity parameters were promoted by captivity; however, a genetic diversity condition maintained by artificial genetic flow was identified, perhaps allowing for the required introgression of gene diversity into this closed population. A wider analysis is recommended and the implications are discussed. Within a realistic forecast of expanding sport hunting, the achievement of useful, pragmatic, and strict conservancy programs of this species, considering approaches such as those used here, will be necessary. {\circledC} 2013 Taylor & Francis.",
author = "Hern{\'a}ndez-Mendoza, {Perla M.} and Parra-Bracamonte, {Gaspar M.} and {De La Rosa-Reyna}, {Xochitl F.} and Omar Chassin-Noria and Sifuentes-Rinc{\'o}n, {Ana M.}",
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language = "American English",
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Genetic shifts in the transition from wild to farmed white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) population. / Hernández-Mendoza, Perla M.; Parra-Bracamonte, Gaspar M.; De La Rosa-Reyna, Xochitl F.; Chassin-Noria, Omar; Sifuentes-Rincón, Ana M.

In: International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services and Management, 02.01.2014, p. 3-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Hernández-Mendoza, Perla M.

AU - Parra-Bracamonte, Gaspar M.

AU - De La Rosa-Reyna, Xochitl F.

AU - Chassin-Noria, Omar

AU - Sifuentes-Rincón, Ana M.

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