Genetic parameters and non-genetic influences related to birth weight in farmed white-tailed deer

G. M. Parra-Bracamonte, X. F. De La Rosa-Reyna, N. Treviño-Martínez, W. Arellano-Vera, V. Moreno-Medina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Studying and understanding the sources of variation in early life traits in farmed deer are fundamental for management and/or breeding purposes. Data from a captive white-tailed deer population were analysed to identify non-genetic and genetic factors affecting the birth weight (BW) of fawns. The year, type of birth and sex were included in a fixed linear model to examine their significance. All of the examined non-genetic factors had a highly significant effect on BW (P<0 001). The examined years showed variation attributed to food availability affecting the gestational conditions of does. Male fawns were 193 g heavier than female fawns at birth (P<0 001), and singleton births were associated with a higher BW (2 97±0 043 kg) compared with twin (-0 261 g) and triplet (-0 642 g) fawning (P<0 001). The best-fitting animal model was selected by comparing reduced and complete models. Based on the selected animal model, which included direct genetic and common maternal effects, genetic components and parameters were estimated. The direct heritability was found to be 0 28±0 126, and a small but important contribution of common maternal environmental effects was identified (c 2=0 15±0 062). The results support the importance of certain environmental factors affecting BW and indicate the relevance of direct genetic and maternal environmental influences to sustained genetic changes in BW and positively correlated traits in farmed white-tailed deer populations. © Cambridge University Press 2013.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)497-503
Number of pages446
JournalJournal of Agricultural Science
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Deer
Odocoileus virginianus
Birth Weight
birth weight
fawns
Parturition
Animal Models
animal models
maternal effect
deer
Population
food availability
Breeding
Linear Models
heritability
linear models
Mothers
Food
environmental factors
gender

Cite this

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title = "Genetic parameters and non-genetic influences related to birth weight in farmed white-tailed deer",
abstract = "Studying and understanding the sources of variation in early life traits in farmed deer are fundamental for management and/or breeding purposes. Data from a captive white-tailed deer population were analysed to identify non-genetic and genetic factors affecting the birth weight (BW) of fawns. The year, type of birth and sex were included in a fixed linear model to examine their significance. All of the examined non-genetic factors had a highly significant effect on BW (P<0 001). The examined years showed variation attributed to food availability affecting the gestational conditions of does. Male fawns were 193 g heavier than female fawns at birth (P<0 001), and singleton births were associated with a higher BW (2 97±0 043 kg) compared with twin (-0 261 g) and triplet (-0 642 g) fawning (P<0 001). The best-fitting animal model was selected by comparing reduced and complete models. Based on the selected animal model, which included direct genetic and common maternal effects, genetic components and parameters were estimated. The direct heritability was found to be 0 28±0 126, and a small but important contribution of common maternal environmental effects was identified (c 2=0 15±0 062). The results support the importance of certain environmental factors affecting BW and indicate the relevance of direct genetic and maternal environmental influences to sustained genetic changes in BW and positively correlated traits in farmed white-tailed deer populations. {\circledC} Cambridge University Press 2013.",
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Genetic parameters and non-genetic influences related to birth weight in farmed white-tailed deer. / Parra-Bracamonte, G. M.; De La Rosa-Reyna, X. F.; Treviño-Martínez, N.; Arellano-Vera, W.; Moreno-Medina, V.

In: Journal of Agricultural Science, 01.01.2014, p. 497-503.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Parra-Bracamonte, G. M.

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AU - Arellano-Vera, W.

AU - Moreno-Medina, V.

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