Food distribution's socio-economic relationships and public policy: Mexico City's municipal public markets

Gerardo Torres Salcido, Mario del Roble Pensado Leglise, Andrew Smolski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2015, Taylor & Francis. Traditional food supply systems, like municipal public markets (MPM), are in crisis. Nevertheless, MPMs continue to demonstrate importance in the lives of the cities. In this article we discuss the case of Mexico City and the importance of the public markets for its neighbourhoods. We present the results of two research projects, completed in Mexico City at two different historical times and interpreted longitudinally. The results demonstrate the importance of socio-economic relationships for MPM's survival and potential. The article concludes with public policy recommendations to permit conservation, given the MPM's importance for the city's social cohesion.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)293-305
Number of pages262
JournalDevelopment in Practice
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2015

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public policy
Mexico
food
market
economics
food supply
social cohesion
research project
cohesion
conservation
distribution
city
policy
socioeconomics
public

Cite this

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Food distribution's socio-economic relationships and public policy: Mexico City's municipal public markets. / Torres Salcido, Gerardo; del Roble Pensado Leglise, Mario; Smolski, Andrew.

In: Development in Practice, 01.01.2015, p. 293-305.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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