Exploring plant root-fungal interactions in a neotropical freshwater wetland

Jazmín Santillán-Manjarrez, A. Penélope Solís-Hernández, Patricia Castilla-Hernández, Ignacio E. Maldonado-Mendoza, Gilberto Vela-Correa, Aurora Chimal-Hernández, Claudia Hernández-Díaz, Martha Signoret-Poillon, Diederik van Tuinen, Facundo Rivera-Becerril

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

© 2019 Sociedad Botanica de Mexico, A.C. All rights reserved. Background: Wetlands in Neotropics harbor high fungal diversity, including arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and dark septate endophytes (DSE). This study describes the interaction of plant roots with AMF and DSE in a freshwater wetland belonging to a hotspot of biodiversity. Hypothesis: Differential root colonization between arbuscular mycorrhizal and dark septate endophyte fungi is influenced by plant species and abiotic conditions in a freshwater wetland. Studied species: Plant species colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal and dark septate endophyte fungi. Methods: Properties of soils and the water column, floristic composition, root colonization by AMF and DSE, and molecular identification of AMF inside roots were studied. Results: Soils were Gleysol and flooded during the rainy season. Most of identified plant species were herbaceous, with Cyperus articulatus and Mimosa pigra as the dominant species. Seven of 8 analyzed plant species exhibited differential co-colonization between AMF and DSE. Repeated sampling for one year under flooding/dry conditions demonstrated that C. articulatus and M. pigra were mainly associated with DSE and AMF, respectively. A positive correlation between dissolved O2 in the water column and fungal colonization was observed in C. articulatus. Glomerales and Archaeosporales were molecularly identified inside roots containing arbuscules of M. pigra. Conclusions: Findings highlight differential coexistence between AMF and DSE in plant roots; fungal colonization was influenced by flooding/dry conditions in a neotropical wetland; the community of AMF inside arbusculated roots of M. pigra includes at least four clades.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)661-674
Number of pages14
JournalBotanical Sciences
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Exploring plant root-fungal interactions in a neotropical freshwater wetland'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this