Estimating CO<inf>2</inf> and VOCs production of Colletotrichum fragariae and Rhizopus stolonifer grown in cold stored strawberry fruit

Claudia Rojas-Flores, Rosa Isela Ventura-Aguilar, Silvia Bautista-Baños, Sergio Revah, José Octavio Saucedo-Lucero

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Abstract

© 2019 Elsevier GmbH The aim of this work was to investigate the early detection of anthracnose and soft rot diseases in cold stored strawberry fruit by evaluating the CO2 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by the fungi Colletotrichum fragariae and Rhizopus stolonifer. Strawberries were stored at 5, 10 and 21 °C (control group) and the VOCs and CO2 production of inoculated and non-inoculated strawberries were followed by gas chromatography. To evaluate and estimate the growth of both fungi, the CO2 data were fitted to the Gompertz model. Data of the VOCs released at the end of the fungal growth were analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA) to discriminate between infected and non-infected strawberries. The results showed that fungal growth was affected by temperature and C. fragariae had a maximum growth after 14.6 h at 5 °C and R. stolonifer at 21 °C after 45.2 h. On the other hand, through VOCs released by C. fragariae and R. stolonifer and PCA, four groups were obtained: a) strawberry infected with C. fragariae, stored at 10 °C, b) strawberry infected with R. stolonifer, stored at 21 °C, c) control group kept at 10 °C and, d) strawberry infected with C. fragariae and control group (5 and 21 °C), and strawberry infected with R. stolonifer at 5 and 10 °C. In conclusion, CO2 and VOCs released by C. fragariae and R. stolonifer on strawberries could infer the presence of anthracnose and soft rot during storage of the fruit at low temperature.
Original languageAmerican English
JournalMicrobiological Research
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2019

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