Distribution and abundance of the endangered killifish Fundulus lima, and its interaction with exotic fishes in oases of Central Baja California, Mexico

Gorgonio Ruiz-Campos, Faustino Camarena-Rosales, Salvador Contreras-Balderas, Claudia A. Reyes-Valdez, José De La Cruz-Agüero, Elias Torres-Balcazar

Research output: Contribution to journalScientific review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The distribution and abundance of the endangered Baja California killifish, Fundulus lima, and its interaction with exotic fishes were studied in oases of the central part of Baja California peninsula, Mexico (Río San Ignacio and Río La Purísima basins), from October 2002 to July 2004. Five fish species were recorded: the native killifish and 4 exotics (Cyprinus carpio, Poecilia reticulata, Xiphophorus hellerii, and Tilapia cf. zillii). Two new populations of the killifish are reported for the Rio San Ignacio as well as confirmation of occurrence in the upper Río La Purísima. Density of the killifish in the Rio San Ignacio showed a significant inverse correlation with that of the exotic redbelly tilapia (Tilapia cf. zillii). Baja California killifish densities in both rivers decreased significantly after the hurricane-induced flood event of 23 September 2003, but exhibited notable recovery 10 months later. Relative abundance of killifish at the type locality, San Ignacio oasis, decreased significantly during an 8-year period after introduction of tilapia. The status of Baja California killifish should be changed from threatened to endangered to reflect continued reductions in distribution as result of proliferation of nonnative fishes, particularly redbelly tilapia. Management efforts to reduce abundance of exotic fishes are needed to ensure persistence of the endemic Baja California killifish.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)502-509
Number of pages451
JournalSouthwestern Naturalist
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fundulidae
Fundulus
oases
oasis
Mexico
Tilapia zillii
Fishes
Tilapia
Tilapia (Cichlidae)
fish
type locality
Xiphophorus
Poecilia reticulata
hurricane
hurricanes
relative abundance
Cyprinus carpio
persistence
Cyprinodontiformes
Poecilia

Cite this

Ruiz-Campos, Gorgonio ; Camarena-Rosales, Faustino ; Contreras-Balderas, Salvador ; Reyes-Valdez, Claudia A. ; De La Cruz-Agüero, José ; Torres-Balcazar, Elias. / Distribution and abundance of the endangered killifish Fundulus lima, and its interaction with exotic fishes in oases of Central Baja California, Mexico. In: Southwestern Naturalist. 2006 ; pp. 502-509.
@article{8f008b21a4844bb88c137d12c526de00,
title = "Distribution and abundance of the endangered killifish Fundulus lima, and its interaction with exotic fishes in oases of Central Baja California, Mexico",
abstract = "The distribution and abundance of the endangered Baja California killifish, Fundulus lima, and its interaction with exotic fishes were studied in oases of the central part of Baja California peninsula, Mexico (R{\'i}o San Ignacio and R{\'i}o La Pur{\'i}sima basins), from October 2002 to July 2004. Five fish species were recorded: the native killifish and 4 exotics (Cyprinus carpio, Poecilia reticulata, Xiphophorus hellerii, and Tilapia cf. zillii). Two new populations of the killifish are reported for the Rio San Ignacio as well as confirmation of occurrence in the upper R{\'i}o La Pur{\'i}sima. Density of the killifish in the Rio San Ignacio showed a significant inverse correlation with that of the exotic redbelly tilapia (Tilapia cf. zillii). Baja California killifish densities in both rivers decreased significantly after the hurricane-induced flood event of 23 September 2003, but exhibited notable recovery 10 months later. Relative abundance of killifish at the type locality, San Ignacio oasis, decreased significantly during an 8-year period after introduction of tilapia. The status of Baja California killifish should be changed from threatened to endangered to reflect continued reductions in distribution as result of proliferation of nonnative fishes, particularly redbelly tilapia. Management efforts to reduce abundance of exotic fishes are needed to ensure persistence of the endemic Baja California killifish.",
author = "Gorgonio Ruiz-Campos and Faustino Camarena-Rosales and Salvador Contreras-Balderas and Reyes-Valdez, {Claudia A.} and {De La Cruz-Ag{\"u}ero}, Jos{\'e} and Elias Torres-Balcazar",
year = "2006",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1894/0038-4909(2006)51[502:DAAOTE]2.0.CO;2",
language = "American English",
pages = "502--509",
journal = "Southwestern Naturalist",
issn = "0038-4909",
publisher = "Southwestern Association of Naturalists",

}

Distribution and abundance of the endangered killifish Fundulus lima, and its interaction with exotic fishes in oases of Central Baja California, Mexico. / Ruiz-Campos, Gorgonio; Camarena-Rosales, Faustino; Contreras-Balderas, Salvador; Reyes-Valdez, Claudia A.; De La Cruz-Agüero, José; Torres-Balcazar, Elias.

In: Southwestern Naturalist, 01.12.2006, p. 502-509.

Research output: Contribution to journalScientific review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Distribution and abundance of the endangered killifish Fundulus lima, and its interaction with exotic fishes in oases of Central Baja California, Mexico

AU - Ruiz-Campos, Gorgonio

AU - Camarena-Rosales, Faustino

AU - Contreras-Balderas, Salvador

AU - Reyes-Valdez, Claudia A.

AU - De La Cruz-Agüero, José

AU - Torres-Balcazar, Elias

PY - 2006/12/1

Y1 - 2006/12/1

N2 - The distribution and abundance of the endangered Baja California killifish, Fundulus lima, and its interaction with exotic fishes were studied in oases of the central part of Baja California peninsula, Mexico (Río San Ignacio and Río La Purísima basins), from October 2002 to July 2004. Five fish species were recorded: the native killifish and 4 exotics (Cyprinus carpio, Poecilia reticulata, Xiphophorus hellerii, and Tilapia cf. zillii). Two new populations of the killifish are reported for the Rio San Ignacio as well as confirmation of occurrence in the upper Río La Purísima. Density of the killifish in the Rio San Ignacio showed a significant inverse correlation with that of the exotic redbelly tilapia (Tilapia cf. zillii). Baja California killifish densities in both rivers decreased significantly after the hurricane-induced flood event of 23 September 2003, but exhibited notable recovery 10 months later. Relative abundance of killifish at the type locality, San Ignacio oasis, decreased significantly during an 8-year period after introduction of tilapia. The status of Baja California killifish should be changed from threatened to endangered to reflect continued reductions in distribution as result of proliferation of nonnative fishes, particularly redbelly tilapia. Management efforts to reduce abundance of exotic fishes are needed to ensure persistence of the endemic Baja California killifish.

AB - The distribution and abundance of the endangered Baja California killifish, Fundulus lima, and its interaction with exotic fishes were studied in oases of the central part of Baja California peninsula, Mexico (Río San Ignacio and Río La Purísima basins), from October 2002 to July 2004. Five fish species were recorded: the native killifish and 4 exotics (Cyprinus carpio, Poecilia reticulata, Xiphophorus hellerii, and Tilapia cf. zillii). Two new populations of the killifish are reported for the Rio San Ignacio as well as confirmation of occurrence in the upper Río La Purísima. Density of the killifish in the Rio San Ignacio showed a significant inverse correlation with that of the exotic redbelly tilapia (Tilapia cf. zillii). Baja California killifish densities in both rivers decreased significantly after the hurricane-induced flood event of 23 September 2003, but exhibited notable recovery 10 months later. Relative abundance of killifish at the type locality, San Ignacio oasis, decreased significantly during an 8-year period after introduction of tilapia. The status of Baja California killifish should be changed from threatened to endangered to reflect continued reductions in distribution as result of proliferation of nonnative fishes, particularly redbelly tilapia. Management efforts to reduce abundance of exotic fishes are needed to ensure persistence of the endemic Baja California killifish.

UR - https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=33846597184&origin=inward

UR - https://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=33846597184&origin=inward

U2 - 10.1894/0038-4909(2006)51[502:DAAOTE]2.0.CO;2

DO - 10.1894/0038-4909(2006)51[502:DAAOTE]2.0.CO;2

M3 - Scientific review

SP - 502

EP - 509

JO - Southwestern Naturalist

JF - Southwestern Naturalist

SN - 0038-4909

ER -