Current and future considerations for shark conservation in the Northeast and Eastern Central Pacific Ocean

Shawn Larson, Dayv Lowry, Nicholas K. Dulvy, Jim Wharton, Felipe Galván-Magaña, Abraham B. Sianipar, Christopher G. Lowe, Erin Meyer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sharks are iconic and ecologically important predators found in every ocean. Because of their ecological role as predators, some considered apex predators, and concern over the stability of their populations due to direct and indirect overfishing, there has been an increasing amount of work focussed on shark conservation, and other elasmobranchs such as skates and rays, around the world. Here we discuss many aspects of current shark science and conservation and the path to the future of shark conservation in the Northeastern and Eastern Central Pacific. We explore their roles in ecosystems as keystone species; the conservation measures and laws in place at the international, national, regional and local level; the conservation status of sharks and rays in the region, fisheries for sharks in the Northcentral Pacific specifically those that target juveniles and the implications to shark conservation; a conservation success story: the recovery of Great White Sharks in the Northeast Pacific; public perceptions of sharks and the roles zoos and aquariums play in shark conservation; and the path to the future of shark conservation that requires bold partnerships, local stakeholders and innovative measures.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Marine Biology
EditorsCharles Sheppard
PublisherAcademic Press
Pages1-49
Number of pages49
ISBN (Print)9780128215272
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameAdvances in Marine Biology
Volume90
ISSN (Print)0065-2881
ISSN (Electronic)2162-5875

Keywords

  • Chondrichthyes
  • Conservation
  • Elasmobranchs
  • Endangered
  • Fisheries
  • IUCN
  • Sharks and rays
  • Threatened

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