Biohydrogen production based on the evaluation of kinetic parameters of a mixed microbial culture using glucose and fruit-vegetable waste as feedstocks

E. I. Garcia-Peña, M. Canul-Chan, I. Chairez, E. Salgado-Manjarez, J. Aranda-Barradas

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Abstract

Hydrogen (H2) production from the organic fraction of solid waste such as fruit and vegetable waste (FVW) is a novel and feasible energy technology. Continuous application of this process would allow for the simultaneous treatment of organic residues and energy production. In this study, batch experiments were conducted using glucose as substrate, and data of H 2 production obtained were successfully adjusted by a logistic model. The kinetic parameters (μ max = 0.101 h-1, K s = 2.56 g/L) of an H2-producing microbial culture determined by the Monod and Haldane-Andrews growth models were used to establish the continuous culture conditions. This strategy led to a productive steady state in continuous culture. Once the steady state was reached in the continuous reactor, a maximum H2 production of 700 mL was attained. The feasibility of producing H2 from the FVW obtained from a local market in Mexico City was also evaluated using batch conditions. The effect of the initial FVW concentration on the H2 production and waste organic material degradation was determined. The highest H2 production rate (1.7 mmol/day), the highest cumulative H2 volume (310 mL), and 25 % chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were obtained with an initial substrate (FVW) concentration of 37 g COD/L. The lowest H2 production rates were obtained with relatively low initial substrate concentrations of 5 and 11 g COD/L. The H2 production rates with FVW were also characterized by the logistic model. Similar cumulative H2 production was obtained when glucose and FVW were used as substrates. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)279-293
Number of pages249
JournalApplied Biochemistry and Biotechnology
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2013

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Vegetables
Fruits
Kinetic parameters
Feedstocks
Glucose
Fruit
Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis
Chemical oxygen demand
Logistic Models
Substrates
Solid Waste
Logistics
Mexico
Hydrogen
Solid wastes
Technology
Growth
Degradation

Cite this

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title = "Biohydrogen production based on the evaluation of kinetic parameters of a mixed microbial culture using glucose and fruit-vegetable waste as feedstocks",
abstract = "Hydrogen (H2) production from the organic fraction of solid waste such as fruit and vegetable waste (FVW) is a novel and feasible energy technology. Continuous application of this process would allow for the simultaneous treatment of organic residues and energy production. In this study, batch experiments were conducted using glucose as substrate, and data of H 2 production obtained were successfully adjusted by a logistic model. The kinetic parameters (μ max = 0.101 h-1, K s = 2.56 g/L) of an H2-producing microbial culture determined by the Monod and Haldane-Andrews growth models were used to establish the continuous culture conditions. This strategy led to a productive steady state in continuous culture. Once the steady state was reached in the continuous reactor, a maximum H2 production of 700 mL was attained. The feasibility of producing H2 from the FVW obtained from a local market in Mexico City was also evaluated using batch conditions. The effect of the initial FVW concentration on the H2 production and waste organic material degradation was determined. The highest H2 production rate (1.7 mmol/day), the highest cumulative H2 volume (310 mL), and 25 {\%} chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were obtained with an initial substrate (FVW) concentration of 37 g COD/L. The lowest H2 production rates were obtained with relatively low initial substrate concentrations of 5 and 11 g COD/L. The H2 production rates with FVW were also characterized by the logistic model. Similar cumulative H2 production was obtained when glucose and FVW were used as substrates. {\circledC} 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.",
author = "Garcia-Pe{\~n}a, {E. I.} and M. Canul-Chan and I. Chairez and E. Salgado-Manjarez and J. Aranda-Barradas",
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T1 - Biohydrogen production based on the evaluation of kinetic parameters of a mixed microbial culture using glucose and fruit-vegetable waste as feedstocks

AU - Garcia-Peña, E. I.

AU - Canul-Chan, M.

AU - Chairez, I.

AU - Salgado-Manjarez, E.

AU - Aranda-Barradas, J.

PY - 2013/9/1

Y1 - 2013/9/1

N2 - Hydrogen (H2) production from the organic fraction of solid waste such as fruit and vegetable waste (FVW) is a novel and feasible energy technology. Continuous application of this process would allow for the simultaneous treatment of organic residues and energy production. In this study, batch experiments were conducted using glucose as substrate, and data of H 2 production obtained were successfully adjusted by a logistic model. The kinetic parameters (μ max = 0.101 h-1, K s = 2.56 g/L) of an H2-producing microbial culture determined by the Monod and Haldane-Andrews growth models were used to establish the continuous culture conditions. This strategy led to a productive steady state in continuous culture. Once the steady state was reached in the continuous reactor, a maximum H2 production of 700 mL was attained. The feasibility of producing H2 from the FVW obtained from a local market in Mexico City was also evaluated using batch conditions. The effect of the initial FVW concentration on the H2 production and waste organic material degradation was determined. The highest H2 production rate (1.7 mmol/day), the highest cumulative H2 volume (310 mL), and 25 % chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were obtained with an initial substrate (FVW) concentration of 37 g COD/L. The lowest H2 production rates were obtained with relatively low initial substrate concentrations of 5 and 11 g COD/L. The H2 production rates with FVW were also characterized by the logistic model. Similar cumulative H2 production was obtained when glucose and FVW were used as substrates. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

AB - Hydrogen (H2) production from the organic fraction of solid waste such as fruit and vegetable waste (FVW) is a novel and feasible energy technology. Continuous application of this process would allow for the simultaneous treatment of organic residues and energy production. In this study, batch experiments were conducted using glucose as substrate, and data of H 2 production obtained were successfully adjusted by a logistic model. The kinetic parameters (μ max = 0.101 h-1, K s = 2.56 g/L) of an H2-producing microbial culture determined by the Monod and Haldane-Andrews growth models were used to establish the continuous culture conditions. This strategy led to a productive steady state in continuous culture. Once the steady state was reached in the continuous reactor, a maximum H2 production of 700 mL was attained. The feasibility of producing H2 from the FVW obtained from a local market in Mexico City was also evaluated using batch conditions. The effect of the initial FVW concentration on the H2 production and waste organic material degradation was determined. The highest H2 production rate (1.7 mmol/day), the highest cumulative H2 volume (310 mL), and 25 % chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were obtained with an initial substrate (FVW) concentration of 37 g COD/L. The lowest H2 production rates were obtained with relatively low initial substrate concentrations of 5 and 11 g COD/L. The H2 production rates with FVW were also characterized by the logistic model. Similar cumulative H2 production was obtained when glucose and FVW were used as substrates. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

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