Bimetallic Copper-Silver Systems Supported on Natural Clinoptilolite: Long-Term Changes in Nanospecies’ Composition and Stability

Inocente Rodríguez-Iznaga, Vitalii Petranovskii, Fernando Chávez-Rivas, Marina G. Shelyapina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Long-term changes in species of copper-silver bimetallic systems on natural clinoptilolite obtained by ion exchange of Cu2+ and Ag+ and then reduced at different temperatures were studied. Even after storage under ambient conditions, XRD and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra indicate the presence of nanospecies and larger particles of reduced copper and silver. Scanning electron microscopy of aged bimetallic samples, reduced at the highest temperature (450C) and the pristine sample for their preparation, also aged, showed the presence of silver particles with a size of about 100 nm. They are formed in the initial ion-exchanged sample (without reduction) due to the degradation of Ag+ ions. The particles in the reduced sample are larger; in both samples they are evenly distributed over the surface. The presence of silver affects the stability and the mechanism of decomposition/oxidation of reduced copper species, and this stability is higher in bimetallic systems. The decomposition pattern of recently reduced species includes the formation of smaller nanoparticles and few-atomic clusters. This can occur, preceding the complete oxidation of Cu to ions. Quasicolloidal silver, which is present in fresh bimetallic samples reduced at lower temperatures, transforms after aging into Ag8 clusters, which indicates the stability of these nanospecies on natural clinoptilolite.

Original languageEnglish
Article number34
JournalInorganics
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2022

Keywords

  • Bimetallic system
  • Clinoptilolite zeolite
  • Copper
  • Nanospecies
  • Silver

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