Association of Listeria monocytogenes LIPI-1 and LIPI-3 marker llsX with invasiveness

Rodolfo Erik Vilchis-Rangel, María del Rosario Espinoza-Mellado, Irving Jesús Salinas-Jaramillo, Marcos Daniel Martinez-Peña, Oscar Rodolfo Rodas-Suárez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

© 2019, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. Listeria monocytogenes is an opportunistic pathogen that is widely distributed in the environment. The evolution of its genome has exhibited differences in virulence among strains of the same species. Listeria monocytogenes LIPI-3 (Listeria Pathogenicity Island 3) and LIPI-1 (Listeria Pathogenicity Island 1) are considered responsible for the increased virulence in some strains. The aim of this study was to detect LIPI-1 genes and the llsX gene belonging to LIPI-3 in invasive strains of L. monocytogenes and to establish whether there is a relationship among the invasiveness, presence of the llsX and LIPI-1 genes, and the source of the strains. The results showed that 70% of the strains were invasive, and all these strains except one possessed LIPI-1, which suggests that although there is a correlation between LIPI-1 and invasiveness, the independent mechanisms of LIPI-1 may contribute to invasiveness. In contrast, 35% of the total strains were positive for llsX and were invasive; thus, the results revealed that there is a strong association between llsX and the invasiveness of L. monocytogenes in HEp-2 cells (HeLa contaminant/epithelial in origin). In addition, there is no other association with any other variable in this study. Moreover, the authors found that LIPI-1 and llsX are more frequently found in fresh than in frozen vegetables. Together, the findings provide an approximation for the better understanding of Listeriolysin S (LLS) and its role in the pathogenesis of L. monocytogenes, and a possible relation between virulence factors and food-storage temperature.
Original languageAmerican English
JournalCurrent Microbiology
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2019

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Genomic Islands
Listeria
Listeria monocytogenes
Virulence
Food Storage
Genes
Virulence Factors
HeLa Cells
Vegetables
Genome
Temperature

Cite this

Vilchis-Rangel, Rodolfo Erik ; Espinoza-Mellado, María del Rosario ; Salinas-Jaramillo, Irving Jesús ; Martinez-Peña, Marcos Daniel ; Rodas-Suárez, Oscar Rodolfo. / Association of Listeria monocytogenes LIPI-1 and LIPI-3 marker llsX with invasiveness. In: Current Microbiology. 2019.
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abstract = "{\circledC} 2019, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. Listeria monocytogenes is an opportunistic pathogen that is widely distributed in the environment. The evolution of its genome has exhibited differences in virulence among strains of the same species. Listeria monocytogenes LIPI-3 (Listeria Pathogenicity Island 3) and LIPI-1 (Listeria Pathogenicity Island 1) are considered responsible for the increased virulence in some strains. The aim of this study was to detect LIPI-1 genes and the llsX gene belonging to LIPI-3 in invasive strains of L. monocytogenes and to establish whether there is a relationship among the invasiveness, presence of the llsX and LIPI-1 genes, and the source of the strains. The results showed that 70{\%} of the strains were invasive, and all these strains except one possessed LIPI-1, which suggests that although there is a correlation between LIPI-1 and invasiveness, the independent mechanisms of LIPI-1 may contribute to invasiveness. In contrast, 35{\%} of the total strains were positive for llsX and were invasive; thus, the results revealed that there is a strong association between llsX and the invasiveness of L. monocytogenes in HEp-2 cells (HeLa contaminant/epithelial in origin). In addition, there is no other association with any other variable in this study. Moreover, the authors found that LIPI-1 and llsX are more frequently found in fresh than in frozen vegetables. Together, the findings provide an approximation for the better understanding of Listeriolysin S (LLS) and its role in the pathogenesis of L. monocytogenes, and a possible relation between virulence factors and food-storage temperature.",
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Association of Listeria monocytogenes LIPI-1 and LIPI-3 marker llsX with invasiveness. / Vilchis-Rangel, Rodolfo Erik; Espinoza-Mellado, María del Rosario; Salinas-Jaramillo, Irving Jesús; Martinez-Peña, Marcos Daniel; Rodas-Suárez, Oscar Rodolfo.

In: Current Microbiology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Vilchis-Rangel, Rodolfo Erik

AU - Espinoza-Mellado, María del Rosario

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AU - Martinez-Peña, Marcos Daniel

AU - Rodas-Suárez, Oscar Rodolfo

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AB - © 2019, Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature. Listeria monocytogenes is an opportunistic pathogen that is widely distributed in the environment. The evolution of its genome has exhibited differences in virulence among strains of the same species. Listeria monocytogenes LIPI-3 (Listeria Pathogenicity Island 3) and LIPI-1 (Listeria Pathogenicity Island 1) are considered responsible for the increased virulence in some strains. The aim of this study was to detect LIPI-1 genes and the llsX gene belonging to LIPI-3 in invasive strains of L. monocytogenes and to establish whether there is a relationship among the invasiveness, presence of the llsX and LIPI-1 genes, and the source of the strains. The results showed that 70% of the strains were invasive, and all these strains except one possessed LIPI-1, which suggests that although there is a correlation between LIPI-1 and invasiveness, the independent mechanisms of LIPI-1 may contribute to invasiveness. In contrast, 35% of the total strains were positive for llsX and were invasive; thus, the results revealed that there is a strong association between llsX and the invasiveness of L. monocytogenes in HEp-2 cells (HeLa contaminant/epithelial in origin). In addition, there is no other association with any other variable in this study. Moreover, the authors found that LIPI-1 and llsX are more frequently found in fresh than in frozen vegetables. Together, the findings provide an approximation for the better understanding of Listeriolysin S (LLS) and its role in the pathogenesis of L. monocytogenes, and a possible relation between virulence factors and food-storage temperature.

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