Antihyperglycemic and lipid profile effects of salvia amarissima ortega on streptozocin-induced type 2 diabetic mice

Jesus Ivan Solares-Pascasio, Guillermo Ceballos, Fernando Calzada, Elizabeth Barbosa, Claudia Velazquez

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Abstract

Salvia amarissima Ortega was evaluated to determinate its antihyperglycemic and lipid profile properties. Petroleum ether extract of fresh aerial parts of S. amarissima (PEfAPSa) and a secondary fraction (F6Sa) were evaluated to determine their antihyperglycemic activity in streptozocin- induced diabetic (STID) mice, in oral tolerance tests of sucrose, starch, and glucose (OSTT, OStTT, and OGTT, respectively), in terms of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), triglycerides (TG), and highdensity lipoprotein (HDL). In acute assays at doses of 50 mg/kg body weight (b.w.), PEfAPSa and F6Sa showed a reduction in hyperglycemia in STID mice, at the first and fifth hour after of treatment, respectively, and were comparable with acarbose. In the sub-chronic test, PEfAPSa and F6Sa showed a reduction of glycemia since the first week, and the effect was greater than that of the acarbose control group. In relation to HbA1c, the treatments prevented the increase in HbA1c. In the case of TG and HDL, PEfAPSa and F6Sa showed a reduction in TG and an HDL increase from the second week. OSTT and OStTT showed that PEfAPSa and F6Sa significantly lowered the postprandial peak at 1 h after loading but only in sucrose or starch such as acarbose. The results suggest that S. amarissima activity may be mediated by the inhibition of disaccharide hydrolysis, which may be associated with an α-glucosidase inhibitory effect.

Original languageEnglish
Article number947
JournalMolecules
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Feb 2021

Keywords

  • Antihyperglycemic activity
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Lipid profile
  • Salvia amarissima Ortega

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