Analyzing the spatial dynamics of a prey-predator lattice model with social behavior

Mario Martínez Molina, Marco A. Moreno-Armendáriz, Juan Carlos Seck Tuoh Mora

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2015 Elsevier B.V. A lattice prey-predator model is studied. Transition rules applied sequentially describe processes such as reproduction, predation, and death of predators. The movement of predators is governed by a local particle swarm optimization algorithm, which causes the formation of swarms of predators that propagate through the lattice. Starting with a single predator in a lattice fully covered by preys, we observe a wavefront of predators invading the zones dominated by preys; subsequent fronts arise during the transient phase, where a monotonic approach to a fixed point is present. After the transient phase the system enters an oscillatory regime, where the amplitude of oscillations appears to be bounded but is difficult to predict. We observe qualitative similar behavior even for larger lattices. An empirical approach is used to determine the effects of the movement of predators on the temporal dynamics of the system. Our results show that the algorithm used to model the movement of predators increases the proficiency of predators.
Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)192-202
Number of pages171
JournalEcological Complexity
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2015

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predators
social behavior
predator
Wavefronts
Particle swarm optimization (PSO)
swarms
death
oscillation
predation
oscillations
optimization

Cite this

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title = "Analyzing the spatial dynamics of a prey-predator lattice model with social behavior",
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Analyzing the spatial dynamics of a prey-predator lattice model with social behavior. / Molina, Mario Martínez; Moreno-Armendáriz, Marco A.; Carlos Seck Tuoh Mora, Juan.

In: Ecological Complexity, 01.06.2015, p. 192-202.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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